3 Comments

Adviser Blackout: Why Isn’t Your Site Showing Up in Google Results?

One of the top reasons advisers come to us for help is to get their site to show up early in Google search results. It makes perfect sense. You’re a great adviser, so you want to be front and center when someone searches for “financial adviser [your city].”

Before we get started, let’s look at why search engine optimization, commonly referred to as SEO, matters. (Many thanks to Hubspot for compiling all these statistics.)

  • Google gets more than 100 billion searches per month
  • 81 percent of shoppers do online research before making a decision
  • 51 percent of smartphone users have discovered a new company while performing a search on their phone

With so many people researching and finding new companies through search engines—especially Google—advisers need to make search ranking a priority.

The problem is that Google’s algorithms (which determine the results of searches) are constantly evolving. According to Google, they change their algorithm at least once a day, and they’re reported to make up to 600 changes per year.

So how are we supposed to keep up? These three factors have been proven to play a big role in determining results.

1.) Establish Authority. SEO experts are always talking about the importance of establishing something called authority. It can seem like a vague and difficult concept when it comes to web search, but it’s really fairly simple.

For the same reason I don’t show up until page six of the results when I Google “Zach McDonald,” you have to prove that you are one of the items people want to find when they search for “financial adviser [city/state].”

If your site is brand new and your visits are fairly minimal, Google won’t ascribe much importance to you.

You have to establish authority first by publishing useful blogs and promoting those blogs via social and paid ads. After that, you have to give Google a little time to recognize that people now want to see your website. Once that’s established, you’ll see your rankings rise. And when I say “give Google a little time,” I mean anywhere from six months to more than a year.

2.) Make Sure Your Mobile and Desktop Sites Match Up. Mobile searches first outpaced desktop a couple years ago and have continued to do so ever since. As a result, Google has continuously tweaked their algorithms to place more and more importance on mobile sites.

Last November, Google announced they will be adopting a mobile-first indexing strategy.

Basically, they’ve been evaluating websites using desktop content for years, but a lot of sites have “lite” mobile versions to make them easier to navigate on a phone. That leads to issues when the majority of people use their phones for searches, then get results based on desktop content, and end up on the mobile site, which may or may not have the content they searched for.

So Google’s going mobile-first (probably sometime in 2018), and that means your mobile site needs to have the same information as your desktop site. While they may not fully implement mobile-first indexing for a little while, chances are their algorithms are already leaning heavily in that direction, so now’s the time to fix this problem.

Bottom line: You don’t want Google’s bots, which determine if you belong in their search results, scanning your mobile “lite” site and missing essential blogs and other information that could boost your standing.

If you have a responsive site—where your website looks different on mobile than desktop but the content is all the same—then you’re fine. That’s one of the reasons we only develop websites in WordPress: responsiveness comes standard.

If you have different mobile and desktop versions, here are some tips from Google on how you can bring your site up to speed.

Want to talk about how we can help your website achieve true mobile-friendliness? Drop us a line.

3.) Follow These Three Simple Rules of Local SEO. One of the first rules of SEO is that content is king. Produce quality blogs and videos regularly, attract people to your site, and your search ranking will improve.

And that’s absolutely true—except when it comes to local SEO. Getting into local searches has little to nothing to do with blogs (although getting to the top of those searches is a different story). It’s typically established through your site’s pages.

Here are three simple things you (or even your intern!) can do today that can make a big difference when people search for “financial adviser [your city].”

Make sure your firm name, address, and phone number are on every page, and that they’re always cited in the same way. This one’s so important that SEO experts have even designated an acronym for it: NAP (name, address, phone number). It’s easy to do—just insert that info into your site’s footer. As simple as that seems, this is one of the most common mistakes on business websites. Wherever you insert your NAP info, do your best to keep it consistent. There is some debate in the SEO community over whether NAP formatting inconsistencies affect your site’s rankings, but it’s better better to be safe than sorry.

Register with Google My Business and Bing Places. This takes just a few minutes. Fill out your profile using the links above, and make it as full as possible. Google loves it when people play by their rules, so if you only put your name and phone number in there, chances are they’re dinging you for that. Put in your website, appointment URL, phone number, address, office hours, and even add a couple pictures. Same with Bing.

You won’t see results immediately on this one. After you register, they’ll mail you a postcard with a PIN to confirm that you’re actually affiliated with the business. It took about two weeks for our postcard to come when we registered.

Register with online directories. Claim your firm’s profile on sites like MerchantCircle, Yelp, Local.com, your local newspaper’s directory, and chamber of commerce, just to name a few. That way you can make sure your firm’s information is correct (not to mention you can easily respond to reviews if you feel so inclined). When your NAP information on directory listings matches the information on your website, the Google gods will smile upon thee. If Yelp has your number wrong and somebody tries to call you, they’ll probably either assume you went out of business or just move on to another firm.

Don’t expect overnight results. SEO is a long process. We helped a client edit, publish and release a book last year. Now, almost a year later, their book is at the top of Google results. That success story required planning, strategizing and promotion (and patience), but the end result is worth it.

Your digital presence doesn’t just happen; it’s what you make it. Follow these three steps and you’ll be on your way up in Google’s results.

zach-mcdonald
Zach McDonald is the editorial director at Mineral Interactive, which partners with client-focused firms looking for custom marketing solutions.  


Leave a comment

5 Top Tips to Target Your Niche Better with Video

“The riches are in the niches,” is a saying that’s still true. When you specialize in a narrow niche, it opens up broad opportunities for you. There is so much abundance in the world, and paradoxically the best way to gain a wide open field of opportunity is to go deep into one narrow area and become a rock star expert in that specialty.

When you focus on a niche, it makes everything easier. You’ll attract and capture clients more easily because you’re perceived as an expert; you’ll know where to find your ideal client to market to them more effectively; and you’ll become world-class in your level of service because you’re focused on one thing that you do extraordinarily well.

Here are five ways to make your marketing to your niche specialty irresistible using the most effective marketing tool available today: video.

1.) Get custom videos that are laser focused on your niche. When you demonstrate your expertise in your niche with video content, you show your prospects and clients that you are truly an authority and an expert, to the point that you have your own video series about your specialty!

2.) Make sure your videos are short and sweet. The ideal length for marketing videos is 1-2 minutes, so don’t make the mistake of believing that people will give you their time in our rushed world. Keep your marketing succinct. You’ll find that you’ll be a better communicator when you force yourself to be brief.

3.) Educate, Don’t Sell. The new direction of marketing is “Content Marketing”, which means that you provide valuable educational content about your niche to attract your ideal client. When you demonstrate your expertise through your digital marketing, you’ll build good will and be seen as a valuable resource for the financial questions your prospects and clients are asking themselves.

4.) Feature a mix of “talking head” and animated videos. These two styles of videos bring very different advantages. “Talking head” videos help people feel like they know you personally, which helps them like and trust you, and makes them more likely to become your client. Animated videos are usually more entertaining and engaging than talking head videos, which keeps your audience watching longer. The visual aspect of animation helps make complex concepts simple, which is a perfect fit for conveying complicated financial information.

5.) Leverage your video content on multiple digital platforms. Video is like a super tool that makes every other digital marketing strategy more effective. Post your videos on your website, your blog, your social media, and in your email newsletter to get maximum return on investment.

Editor’s note: Jill Addison will be a panelist at the Women and Finance Knowledge Circle for the 2017 FPA Knowledge Circle Summit pre-conference event in Nashville on Sunday, October 3. To sign up, click here to register for the FPA Annual Conference, and check the box next to “FPA Knowledge Circle Summit” near the bottom of the registration form. If you’ve already registered, but would like to attend the Knowledge Circle Summit, contact the FPA Member Engagement Team at (800) 322-4237, Option 2.

Jill Addison
Jill Addison is the founder and president of FA Client Machine, a digital media company specializing in helping financial advisers automate marketing, stand out with educational and entertaining videos and engage prospects and clients with a digital presence.


Leave a comment

5 Tips to Help You Take Charge of Your Social Media Strategy

If your biggest challenge as a financial planner is finding and acquiring new clients, you’re not alone. Nearly two-thirds of financial planners recently surveyed by the Financial Planning Association listed “client acquisition” as their top challenge.

And yet, the money and skillset required to come up with an effective prospecting—and what it might take to execute the plan—can make attracting new clients seem impossible.

While certainly not a magic bullet on its own, social media can be a cost-effective way to build your personal and professional brand and connect with potential clients in a genuine, authentic manner.

This post offers five tips to help clear up common misconceptions about using social media in business and to help you begin building a social-driven prospecting strategy from the ground up.

1.) Recognize the Uses of Each Platform. One mistake when using social media is to immediately build a profile on every platform without thinking through how to create or curate content for each separate entity.

Placing the exact same content on multiple platforms can make your brand look lazy and out of touch. What works on Instagram may be the opposite of what drives engagement on LinkedIn. Further, creating and curating the amount of content required to run a functional blog/website and generate activity on four to five separate social platforms is simply not an option for most small businesses.

Avoid the temptation to build a profile on any social outlet until you have worked out why and how you plan to use the platform. Here are a few tips on some of the heaviest hitters:

LinkedIn is primarily a professional network, and the content that performs best on the platform follows suit. Investopedia reports in its article “LinkedIn: How Advisors Can Use It to Grow” that nearly three-quarters of U.S. advisers maintain a profile, so it may be a good place to look at focusing your initial efforts.

Facebook and Instagram are more personal, with Instagram focusing heavily on imagery. This is not to say that you can’t or shouldn’t have a profile on these platforms, as many advisers do—it all depends on the type of clients you’re trying to reach, the content you are looking to create and/or share and whether you can support many platforms at once.

Twitter is essentially a newsfeed and, while the content required for each post is smaller in volume (140-character limit), the platform requires a larger volume of posts to maintain a semblance of activity.

2.) Find Your Formula. Businesses that use the social platforms for promotion often treat the content as a one-way street to aggressively push product and sales-related information. In his blog post “Why Content is Fire and Social Media is Gasoline,” marketing guru Jay Baer said, “Social media was not intended to be the world’s shortest press release.” I believe social media was designed to replicate human conversation, and building a healthy following is dependent on how well you tell your personal and professional story.

While advisers are somewhat limited in how much they can engage in two-way discussions on social media, one area that can make a major difference is in how you curate and deliver content. If your profile summary, original posts and retweets on Twitter reflect the tone of a sales brochure, you risk driving people away.

Instead, as you’re crafting your profile, writing your first few posts and deciding what to retweet or share, think about how you prefer to get to know someone when you meet in a face-to-face conversation. What do you want people to know about you? What are the things that are most important to you? What defines you? Answering these questions will help you frame your presence in a way that best reflects who you really are.

My good friend (and social media expert) Steffen Kaplan (@SpinItSocial) shared a formula for building an online presence that I have found to be unbelievably valuable, especially when it comes to attracting followers on Twitter. He recommends parsing the content you create, what you share and what you like into three separate buckets: one-third of your posts should be designed to create awareness about your business (think of this as your “branded” content), another third should be personal (answering the questions outlined above) and the last third should be content designed to engage and inspire (quotes, photos and videos that might make others smile).

3.) Share Content That Tells Your Story. Most advisers know they need to do a better job promoting their practice and value proposition, but many don’t consider themselves to be marketers or know where to start in communicating with prospective clients. In the past, promotion didn’t matter as much, as a high percentage of new clients came via referrals from happy customers.

In today’s world, communications should be more persuasive and educational than a simple list of your services. But who has time to create all that content and send it to the right people at the right time? The beauty of the level of saturation in the blogging and social media world is that you don’t need to spend all your time creating your own materials—you can easily find educational content that you appreciate and share it with your clients.

When you share content, you are advocating for the message of the material, and that’s often the closest thing to putting your name on it. Beyond saving time and money, shared content comes with its own set of advantages as it allows you to send powerful messages from a credible third party. Relevant, useful and valuable content is an effective way to build trust with current and prospective clients. As content marketing expert Drew Davis puts it, “Content builds relationships. Relationships are built on trust. Trust drives revenue.”

4.) Don’t Overdo It. You don’t have to post content 50 times a day to be successful. Sure, social media requires creating and posting content with a high level of frequency, but that doesn’t mean you must spend your entire day brainstorming your next tweet.

Like any other marketing medium, social media success depends on the quality of the content you distribute—including the actual post, the attached image or GIF and the post’s linked content. To help focus on quality over quantity (and maintain your sanity), create a simple editorial calendar and plan out posts for each week or month. You can find countless free content calendar templates with a quick online search, but a traditional printed cat or firefighter calendar will also work just fine.

5.) Have Fun! Seriously, have some fun with it and do your best to be you. Your readers and followers will appreciate it, and it will make your content better in the long run.

Happy Tweeting!

Disclaimer: Before you go down this path, it’s important to understand FINRA’s regulations surrounding the use of social media, as well as any guidelines provided by your broker-dealer or RIA, if applicable.

Dan_Martin_Headshot
Dan Martin is the director of marketing for the Financial Planning Association®, the principal professional organization for CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER (CFP®) professionals, educators, financial services professionals and students who seek advancement in a growing, dynamic profession. He is an award-winning author with a diverse financial services industry background in marketing and communications. He earned a journalism degree from the University of Denver and his MBA in marketing from the Daniels College of Business.


1 Comment

The Circle of WOW

On a recent flight home, after giving a keynote speech on driving deep client loyalty in the financial services industry, the woman sitting next to me asked about my business. It turns out that she was a public relations executive for the dental industry.

Intrigued, I asked, “What is the most effective slogan you have ever authored in your world of teeth?” She responded, “Simple. This one: you don’t have to floss every tooth, just the ones you want to keep.”

Instructive! So it is for clients in the financial services industry: you do not have to connect emotionally, or make meaning with every client, just the ones you want to keep.

Let’s be candid: nobody can control market events, but investment advisory teams can control how they connect emotionally with clients, colleagues and others. Regulatory changes and challenging investment environments should remind us that making stronger connections is more important than ever. And a key way of doing that is what we at Janus Henderson Labs affectionately refer to as The Art of WOW—focusing on actions that build impactful connections with those we care about at work and beyond.

Launching a meaningful wow journey requires planning. We like to start with “The Circle of WOW,” a four-step business development approach designed to fire up your business development efforts and start a perpetual upward spiral of results:

Step 1: Evaluate. Find your super-niche that helps you grow on purpose, not by accident. No matter what your profession—cultivating a “happiness advantage” is a natural outcome of discovering your unique business tranche (UBT) and developing your business around it.

Step 2: Activate. Identify and WOW your “Client Marketing Officers” and never ask for a referral again. Learn to consistently deliver WOW experiences to key members of your UBT, and leverage their guidance on how to grow your business with the help of other extraordinary members of the group.

Step 3: Replicate. Curate ideal clients and quit prospecting as you know it. With the help of your Client Marketing Officers, identify best new prospective clients and connect with them based on the fundamentals of WOW. Design each prospect’s experience based on a customized assertion schedule.

Step 4: Perpetuate. Create a magnetic ecosystem. Stop promoting and start attracting (and connecting). Deliberately cultivate personal rituals and design your environment to continually attract and nurture your UBT. Maintain a strong presence as an expert and dominate your space with unmistakable joy and command.

While WOWing our clients is certainly an art, we follow an actionable playbook on how unexpected, thoughtful behavior can elevate you from a professional resource to a provider of truly personalized service.

To learn more contact Janus Henderson about The Art of WOW. Our program, designed to drive extreme client loyalty, was developed in partnership with Dr. Joseph Michelli, internationally recognized client experience expert and author of The New Gold Standard: 5 Leadership Principles for Creating a Legendary Customer Experience Courtesy of the Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company and The Starbucks Experience.

JohnEvans
John L. Evans Jr., E.D., is the executive director of Janus Henderson Labs of Janus Henderson Investors, formerly Janus Capital Group. He is a practice management expert who conducts extensive consulting and training with top financial intermediaries and businesss leaders worldwide.

 


1 Comment

Use the ‘Mere Exposure Effect’ to Attract More Clients

We tend to like people we’re most familiar with.

According to this Social Psych Online article, the phenomenon of liking something or someone after we become more familiar with them is called the mere exposure effect.

Basically, the more you see or hear something, the you more you like it. A 1992 study published in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology demonstrated just how far mere exposure can go. Scientific American noted also that people tend to like people they share things in common with.

Researchers had four different women with similar appearances attend a college class numerous times throughout the semester. One woman didn’t go to any classes, another attended five times, another attended 10 times and the last one attended 15 times. The women simply sat in on the lecture, not interacting with any students.

At the end of the semester, students were asked to evaluate the women on several scales, one of which was physical attractiveness. They rated the woman who’d been to the class 15 times more positively than the other three, Social Psych Online reported.

How Can Advisers use Mere Exposure to Their Advantage?

So just by being around others more often, you have a greater chance that they will view you more favorably. This underlies many of the tenets of networking; the more you put yourself out there, the more others will view you more favorably over time.

But, you don’t have to physically be present for mere exposure to work. Advertisers like McDonalds discovered this long ago, and have been using it to their advantage for decades, as noted in this Science Blogs post.

By sharing information about yourself online, being active on social media and participating in online discussions, others will come to feel as if they know you and will be more likely to feel that they like you.

Twenty over Ten notes that you can nurture this even more if you go one step further and share a bit of personal information about yourself. Write blog posts or articles that include personal anecdotes and stories, which open the door to building rapport and allowing prospective clients to find things about you that they might share in common.

10 Blog Post Ideas to Write and Share to Speed Up the Mere Exposure Process

Every blog post you write is a chance for readers to learn more about you. We know that consumers make choices based not just on services, but based on who they ultimately think they’d enjoy working with.

1.) “Meet the Team”

A “meet the team” post is essentially a blog post that revolves around a Q&A session with you or one of your colleagues. Sharing a glimpse into that team member’s life allows your readers to get a better understanding of the individual and who they are as a person. For example, some questions the team could answer are:

  • What gets you up and going every morning?
  • Where is your favorite place you’ve ever been on vacation, and why?
  • What books are on your nightstand?
  • What inspired you to become a financial adviser?

2.) “5 of My All-Time Favorite Books”

Any favorite books? Articles? TV Show Commentaries? The information we are drawn to and consume says a lot about us. Listing these out in a blog post allows readers to get a sense of who you are, and gives you a great talking point. Sharing this post on social media and asking others to share their top five favorite books also fosters discussion—and you may even reach a new audience of prospective clients.

3.) “Financial News I Read Every Day (That Is Worth Your Time Too)”

Similar to example No. 2, you can share the financial news you read to keep up with daily events. Although it is more geared toward finance, this is still a great way of connecting with your audience because it shares a glimpse into your interests and fosters a sense of care. You are staying up-to-date and educated on behalf of your clients—and this blog post would show that.

4.) “A Peek at Our Own Family Budget”

In this type of post, you can share a glimpse into how you and your family budget and save, and the trade-offs you make personally. For instance, you may want to specifically gear toward a scenario like: “Simple Do’s and Don’ts to Saving for a House” if you are building a client base of millennials. You can discuss the uphills, the downhills, the peaks and the trials to budgeting. We are all instinctively drawn to seeing how others live and these types of post naturally pique our interest.

5.) “Conversation with a Current Client”

For this type of blog post, talk to the client in advance to get permission and ensure them they will remain anonymous. Essentially, this blog post should let prospective clients know the type of situations you and your firm deal with when it comes to handling clients and their financial situation. For instance, you might have a series of “Conversations with a Client”—one client in their 30s, one in their 40s, etc.—that revolve around the biggest questions clients have in those age groups. Or your approach could be “Conversation with a Client Business Owner,” etc.

6.) “My Family Vacation”

Have you taken a recent vacation? Talk about how you handled the budget for vacationing, along with friendly travel tips. For instance, you may have some great recommendations for the resort you stayed at, or the beaches you visited. As we all look forward to our vacations and usually spend a good deal of time investigating which locations/resorts/experiences will be the best value and most interesting, your readers will appreciate your own tips.

7.) “Budgeting for Big Life Events”

With weddings, holidays and many of life’s big events, money is always an important factor. In this blog post, you might share how to effectively save and budget for such events. Because the post will be in real-time (especially with holidays) your chances of getting more reads are definitely higher. For example, a post titled “Budget Friendly Tips for Holiday Spending” around November is sure to get many reads!

8.) “The Top 5 Tools I Use to Run My Business (That are Worth Every Penny)”

In this post, you might share the tools you use to run your business. Are there any tech tools that you couldn’t live without on a daily basis? Perhaps there is a scheduler app to schedule appointments? Or you might use Google Drive to share documents? By sharing your top tools, your readers can get a glimpse into your daily practice and immediately feel more connected with tools they may even potentially use themselves.

9.) “How I Save Money Every Day in the Simplest Ways”

Do you cut back on your daily Starbucks coffee and make your own at home? Do you pack your lunch instead of ordering out? Share a glimpse into your daily spending habits, and how your small trade-offs result in large savings. This type of post provides inspiration to your reader, where he or she may even begin to pick up your own smart saving habits. And since you often ask your own clients to track and take note of their own spending, this is a great “practice what you preach” post.

10.) “How I De-stress from the Financial Markets”

Being in the financial industry is isn’t always easy. With fluctuating markets and worrisome clients, it can even be extremely stressful. What daily rituals do you practice to stay at peace? How do you de-stress? Similarly to No. 9, this type of post can also provide plenty of inspiration to your readers, who may also have high-stress jobs.

Sam_Russell_Headshot
Samantha Russell is the director of sales and marketing at Twenty Over Ten, a web development company that creates tailored, mobile-responsive websites for financial advisers. She’s spent the last five years empowering advisers to market themselves effectively online using digital tools. With a background in marketing, social media and public relations, Russell focuses on helping business owners understand the value of their online presence and connecting them with the marketing tools and digital solutions they need to effectively manage their brand and engage clients.


Leave a comment

7 Deadly Sins of Website Design

Thinking of revamping your website? Creating a new website can be tricky and overwhelming. From choosing the design to perfecting the content, the difficulties financial advisers face when trying to create a new site can seem endless—but there is hope. As you embark on your website design journey be sure to avoid these seven cardinal sins.

1.) Lack of content. While a simplistic site can be advantageous, too little content on your website can be detrimental. If working with a copywriter, you should come prepared and be able to articulate who you are, the services you provide, what those services cost and why you are passionate about your work. These are basic content areas that prospective clients visiting your site will be looking for and if not easily found, may cause them to leave your site look elsewhere.

2.) Impersonal. When a consumer chooses a financial adviser, they decide who to work with based ultimately on how they feel about the person providing the service. It is for this reason that the “About” or “Bio” page of an adviser’s website is almost always the second most-visited page after the homepage. You don’t need to overshare. Getting too personal right away might scare away prospective clients. However, in an industry that relies so heavily on trust, it is especially important to be personable. Simply including a photo of yourself and basic personal information can go a long way in making people more likely to trust you with their finances.

Prospective clients want to know who you are, why you do what you do, what your philosophy/approach is, and hear your story. If you can take it one step further and include a quick video introduction of yourself, even better. At the very least, include two great photos—one headshot and one more informal picture—such as you with your family or enjoying a hobby.

3.) Unidentifiable CTAs. Why do you want a website for your business? What’s the point? Whatever your answer may be—whether it’s to have people contact you, sign up for your newsletter or blog, take a risk assessment, etc., the point is for prospects and referrals to vet you and then take some sort of action step. If your call-to-action (CTA) is too difficult to find (or worse—you don’t have one at all), visitors likely won’t take any action at all. For this reason, it’s critical to make it immediately clear what the next step that you want them to take is.

4.) Ineffective CTAs. On the flip side, it’s just as harmful to have too many CTAs. Too many CTAs compete for users attention and can be overwhelming. If you hit your site visitors with too many CTAs at once, they can end up leaving without taking any of your desired next steps. Imagine visiting a site that immediately has a pop-up inviting you to “Get My Weekly Finance Tips Directly to Your Inbox.” Under the pop-up is a button encouraging you to “Download 5 Tips to Retire By 60” and this is located right next to another button that says, “Schedule Your Free Initial Portfolio Review.” All of these CTAs are too much all at once, cluttering a site and making it feel spammy. Having multiple CTAs is fine, but they should be placed throughout your website more naturally, on different subpages and allowing visitors to “find” them as they peruse your content.

5.) Too Much Static Content. Some static content is a good thing—it ensures that your marketing team doesn’t have to be churning out new material 24/7 and it can be comfortably consistent for visitors. However, relying solely on calculators, stock trackers and pre-written articles or content won’t cut it. If static content is the majority of the content on your website, chances are that is feels outdated and impersonal to visitors. Instead, try to find a nice split (rule of thumb is at least 50/50) between static and dynamic content. Try writing content that focuses on the services that you provide and describes how you’re different.

6.) Contact Forms. One of the biggest and most common mistakes in web design are sites that make it too difficult for prospective clients to figure out how to reach you. This includes having super long contact forms that no one wants to take the time to fill out, not having your contact information (phone number or email address) easy to find, and having incorrect or outdated contact information or no contact information at all. Stick to the basics – if you’re using a contact form, only ask visitors for the bare essentials (name, phone number, email, reason for inquiry). Additionally, it’s a good idea to include a distinct “Contact Us” page on your site to ensure visitors see it and make sure your contact information is up to date. Just remember, a web contact form is not a lead gen strategy!

7.) Not Setting Deadlines. Developing a schedule for yourself is the best way to prevent succumbing to this seventh deadly sin. Map out when that first website content draft is due, write down the date you need to send your designer feedback on layout and images and communicate to your website designer your desired site launch date. Not including deadlines for yourself—or not abiding by the deadlines you’ve set—promotes procrastination and makes it difficult to pick back up where you were in the process. Developing a strong, realistic timeline for yourself helps ensure that your website design process goes as smoothly as possible.

 

Sam_Russell_HeadshotSamantha Russell is the director of sales and marketing at Twenty Over Ten, a web development company that creates tailored, mobile-responsive websites for financial advisers. She’s spent the last five years empowering advisers to market themselves effectively online using digital tools. With a background in marketing, social media and public relations, Russell focuses on helping business owners understand the value of their online presence and connecting them with the marketing tools and digital solutions they need to effectively manage their brand and engage clients.

 


Leave a comment

The Fulfillment Formula: Increase Return on Effort and Reap Full Benefits of Independence

If you ask independent financial advisers what the most rewarding part of being on their own is, most would answer:

(1) freedom of being an entrepreneur without a boss or a set schedule, where you can do what matters most to you when you choose;

(2) empowerment from creating your own destiny, leading your life, achieving success on your terms; and

(3) deep satisfaction that comes from developing meaningful connection with clients while directly and positively impacting lives.

These three benefits blend together to render a certain level of fulfillment. Whether that fulfillment is slight or maximized depends on how realized each one is in your professional (and daily) life. Essentially your fulfillment becomes a function of your return on your effort.

I don’t like to trivialize the concept of fulfillment as it is one of my driving core values; however, I know that if I keep the notion of fulfillment amorphous you will not make the progress you desire to mold your practice into what you know it can be. Too many advisers linger in a state of mediocre fulfillment, wondering why they aren’t getting more satisfaction from their work or unsure what to do next to leap from their current plateau.

To help you find clarity I have broken down the concept into what I call The Fulfillment Formula.

fulfillment-formula-jpg

Copyright 2016 Broderick Street Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

The Numerator: Revenue
To increase your return, you can increase your revenue. It may seem obvious why we care about revenue, but for advisers who do not operate with intention to increase revenue, I want to remind you of this: you run a business. You need to make money to continue to have a profitable sustainable business over the long term. Otherwise, you have a hobby, a side gig or a charitable endeavor, and this formula does not apply.

At the very least your revenue needs to cover business expenses and the necessary personal expenses that your income funds. Revenue over that baseline threshold serves luxury personal expenses, savings and retirement, donations, gifts, child or parent support and wherever you choose to direct your cash.

Keeping effort constant, as you increase your revenue, you can achieve a higher return on effort and, thus, greater fulfillment.

The Denominator: Effort
We usually think about effort as the time, energy or money going into your business.

As an entrepreneur, you know it is much more than those resources—it’s also the heart, soul, sweat, blood and tears, too.

With only 24 hours in a day, multiple hats to wear as an entrepreneur, and the pressures of life outside the office, your personal effort can only take you so far before you start to exhaust your resources. You need to shift your support system to your team and technology to gain leverage and lower the effort you exert.

Even if revenue stays the same, as you decrease your effort you increase your return on effort and fulfillment level.

Amplify Your Fulfillment
As you can see, the relationship between revenue and effort renders either positive or negative fulfillment:

  • If your revenue is greater than your effort, you have positive return on effort and therefore a positive level of fulfillment. You may be satisfied with your current position, or you may desire to leap from this plateau to new levels of achievement in your business.
  • If your revenue is less the sum of your effort that you invest, then you will be in a negative state of fulfillment, perhaps questioning why you are continuing on this path or wondering how long it will last.

In either position, your can change your status quo when you increase the dollars coming into your business and/or decrease the effort that you exert in the business.

fulfillment-formula-2-jpg

Copyright 2016 Broderick Street Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

As you grow the numerator or reduce the denominator, you will improve the return on your effort and experience an upward movement of your fulfillment.

Over time, as you build out client attraction and relationship marketing systems and find support for your operations to maximize return from The Fulfillment Formula, you will be able to amplify your fulfillment and reap the full benefits of independence.

Kristin Harad 2014Kristin C. Harad, CFP®
Marketing Trainer/Coach
KristinHarad.com
San Francisco, Calif.