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Be A Gen Savvy Planner: Take Off Your Generational Lenses

Our early environments shape us for the rest of our lives.

That’s why there is so much difference between the generations, said Cam Marston, an expert on generational change and founder of Generational Insights.

Marston told FPA Retreat attendees in April that baby boomers are tough and were never told they were unique or special, so they overcompensated by telling their kids—who are Gen-Xers and millennials—that they were extra special. Therefore, those two generations were raised to think they were unique and that their needs were very important.

“What imprints on younger people impacts them for the rest of their lives,” Marston said. “Millennials and Gen-X have been brought up to say, ‘What’s going to make me happy?’

Planners should understand the vast differences between the generations and know how to talk to and communicate with each one.

Boomers. To connect with the boomer, Marston said, you need to understand how they see the world. They’re hardworking and they have the mentality that retirement is going to be great. They want to hear your story and know where you come from.

Hanging up your diplomas or certificates in your office during your meetings with boomers is a good idea.

Key points about boomers:

1.) Understand and acknowledge their work ethic—which they generally measure in hours (i.e., “I work 50-60 hours a week”).

2.) Ask them about their accomplishments and acknowledge what they’ve done.

3.) Communicate that you are on the same page. Emphasize that you are a team.

5.) Pick up the phone and call them and meet with them in person.

6.) Beware of too much technology.

7.) Know the difference between “leading” baby boomers (older than 62 and like communication that emphasizes how they deserve retirement); and “trailing” baby boomers (ages 53-61 and need to be reassured that they’re going to be OK despite setbacks they experienced in retirement savings thanks to the recession).

Gen-Xers. This generation are stalkers of product and services. They demand to be an educated consumer and are leery of “being had,” Marston said. They are interested in how well you can teach them to make a good decision. Your relationship should be a partnership.

Key points about Gen-Xers:

1.) They are going to do research and have you prove why your advice is better than what they found via this research.

2.) They tend to prefer email and your communication should be brief, succinct and to the point.

3.) Don’t waste your time leaving them voicemails.

4.) Make sure your web presence is pristine—they’ll look you up online before contacting you.

5.) The Gen-X mother has tremendous buying power and influence. She’s coming up in terms of her earning, she’s informed and she’s fully engaged. Keep her happy.

6.) Communicate how decisions will affect them personally.

Millennials. Millennials are individuals with a group orientation. They believe they’re unique but they also enjoy being part of a group.

Millennials think, “You tell me about me and what’s going to happen and how I’m going to feel about it,” Marston said.

Key points about millennials:

1.) They’re optimistic.

2.) You will get more attendance from them if you ask them to bring people. Engage them as a group and they will be more interested.

3.) They feel they are unique and special.

4.) They don’t think so much in the long-term as the other generations.

5.) They are achieving milestones (i.e., getting married, buying houses, having kids) later in life than the previous generations.

6.) Communicate via text messages and social media.

Understand these key points about each generation and try to see the world through their eyes when you’re talking to them.

“Everybody pitches and articulates their value from their own generational lense,” Marston said, “but I’ve got to take my lenses off and put on somebody else’s.”

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Ana Trujillo Limón is associate editor of the Journal of Financial Planning and the editor of the FPA Practice Management Blog. Email her at alimon@onefpa.org


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The Power of Wow

After her particularly stellar basketball season, John Evans, Jr., Ed.D., took his 10-year-old daughter for a trip to the Sarasota, Fla. Ritz Carlton.

On the elevator ride up to their room, he praised her rebounding, her boxing out, her shooting. They settled in, left the hotel, and came back to their room to find a tiny chocolate cake with a message on top reading, “Congratulations on the great season, Susana.”

The bellman had heard the entire conversation and seized the opportunity to give these two guests what Evans refers to as a “wow moment.” He defines this as a unique, emotionally engaging experience that goes beyond expectations and is readily recounted.

Evans, executive director of Janus Henderson Labs of Janus Henderson Investors (formerly Janus Capital Group), told FPA Retreat attendees in April 2017, that generating wow moments for a great client experience, like the one he had at the Ritz Carlton, starts with energy levels, is followed by clarifying your purpose, and ends with expanding your team’s capacity to deliver authentic wow moments (read more about “wow moments” straight from Evans in the June 20 FPA Practice Management Blog post titled, “The Circle of WOW”).

“We have an energy crisis here, ladies and gentleman,” Evans said. “But here is the thing: we can create more energy.”

Evans noted that there are four areas on the energy pyramid: the physical (the fundamental source of fuel, sleep); emotional (the capacity to manage emotions); mental (capacity to organize and focus attention); and spiritual (the purpose beyond self-interest). Of those, we are most stressed in the mental and emotional.

But, Evans noted, stress isn’t always bad.

“Stress is the giver of life,” Evans said. “A life of pillows and marshmallows is no way to live.”

Evans notes that a way to generate more energy in all areas of the pyramid is to embrace stress and abolish multitasking, which he said is “one of the greatest enemies of extraordinary and the pathway to mediocrity.”

It’s counterfeit engagement, he said, and we all need to become more engaged. Focus on one thing at a time, establish healthy habits such as eating right and exercising, and see if your energy levels improve.

Next, advisers must clarify their purpose. Why do you do what you do? What is your purpose? Your cause? Your belief? Actively communicate that from the inside out.

Finally, appoint a “wow czar” or “chief clientologist” whose job it is to help generate these experiences. This person should have tremendous emotional intelligence and be creative.

“We have to be intentional about wow,” Evans said.

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Ana Trujillo Limón is associate editor of the Journal of Financial Planning and the editor of the FPA Practice Management Blog. Email her at alimon@onefpa.org


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How to Get the Right Prospect to Your Event

It happens all the time. An adviser plans a high-end client appreciation dinner or wine event and spends weeks planning every aspect. The dinner menu, the flowers, the drinks, the guests to invite, the seating arrangements—everything is carefully thought through.

And since the adviser is a generous host, clients are invited to bring a guest. The adviser is casual about it but hopes clients will bring along a great prospect, perhaps an executive-level peer. And then the big night comes and the clients show up promptly, ready to have fun—with their 14-year-old daughter in tow.

That’s frustrating. Disappointing. And a missed opportunity! As the host of the event, it’s your job to make sure people know what to expect and whom they should bring to your gathering. It’s great that you want to meet new people, and your existing clients are wonderful sources of prospects for you. But rather than leave it up to clients to bring a friend, it’s far more effective if you can suggest an appropriate guest.

Listen for Name Drops

When you meet with clients, of course you listen closely as they talk about the people, places and activities that are important to them. But you should also be sure to ask questions, when appropriate, to learn more about their golf foursome, book club or brother who moved to town. Keep track of the names that come up in these conversations so that you have a ready pool of good candidates for your business and events. It’s easy from there to say something like the following:

“You mentioned recently that your tennis partner is a lot of fun. I’d be delighted to have her and her husband as my guests at the dinner as well.”

Hopefully, you’ll get to meet the prospect who would be a good fit for your firm (which you know because you’ve Googled her, just to make sure.) But even if that doesn’t happen, your clients will understand the type of person you’re looking to meet by the names you’ve brought up.

Look for Leads

In addition to your own research, you can leverage LinkedIn to find out whom your clients know. Simply visit their profile and click on “See Connections.” This list will quickly and easily give you some ideas of people to suggest your clients bring, and you’ll be able to learn some important details about these people—perhaps their involvement on a hospital board or a past job or charity work.

Hint, Hint

If all else fails, and you still want your clients to bring a prospect, try something simple, like this:

“I’d like this wine tasting to be as much fun as possible for you. As you know, we won’t be talking any business—this is purely for pleasure. Is there a friend, or a couple that you know, who also shares your passion for red wine? If you’d like to bring them along, I’m happy to welcome them. And you know you’ll have a great time.”

This should keep the 14-year-old daughter at home and hopefully open up the invite to a promising prospect. With these tips in mind, you’ll have more enjoyable events while growing your business at the same time.

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Joni Youngwirth, managing principal, practice management, at Commonwealth Financial Network®, Member FINRA/SIPC, helps advisers develop the mindset and systems to grow their businesses to the next level.

 

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Kristine McManus, chief business development officer, practice management, at Commonwealth Financial Network®, Member FINRA/SIPC, works with advisers to grow their top line through the introduction of various programs, tools and coaching.


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4 Ways to Retain Heirs

Ponder this worst-case scenario when it comes to introducing yourself to your client’s heirs: you’re at your client’s funeral and you offer both your condolences and a business card. The chances of those children and grandchildren calling you up after that are pretty slim.

Whatever you think of the younger generations—they’re lazy, entitled, glued to their phones—the fact remains that $24 trillion in wealth will transfer to them by 2030. They’ll need help. Introducing yourself to your clients’ heirs early and genuinely is the key to retaining that business.

Maria Quinn, adviser education specialist for Vanguard, told FPA Retreat attendees in April that there are ways to meaningfully engage with the adult children of your clients. First, Quinn advised, understand how the younger generations are different and how they perceive financial advice; second, fully engage both spouses; and last, authentically connect with the heirs of your clients.

In a 2015 Deloitte survey, 40 percent of boomers surveyed said their children work with a financial planner. Of that 19 percent said those children worked with a firm other than the ones the parents worked with and 21 percent worked with the existing firm.

Combined, Gen X and millennials (born between 1965 to 1997) are 141 million people. They’re different in the way they interact with financial planners. The acronym used to describe them is HENRY: high earner not ready yet. They will have wealth; they just don’t have it yet.

The younger generations are noted as the “401(k) generation,” Quinn said. They are saving automatically and don’t generally know where their money is invested. Both Gen X and millennials are socially conscious and express interest in learning more about retirement from their employer. Gen X tends to be distrustful of the financial advice industry while millennials see it as being too sales oriented.

But a smart move in reaching that next generation is to form a relationship with their mothers. Quinn said that many advisers tend to ignore the wife in client couples.

“She may be quiet in the room, but don’t think she doesn’t have opinions,” Quinn said. “She controls about 90 percent of the decisions. You want her in the room. You want to make sure you’re engaging her as much as you can.”

Some examples Quinn offered attendees to authentically connect with clients’ families were:

Do something special for your favorite clients. Quinn noted a planner who’d planned an 80th birthday party for his favorite client, pleasing her and impressing the family alike.

Offer pro-bono services for life events. Offer to do a financial plan for your clients’ children when you hear they are getting married or are expecting a baby. This could help forge a new client relationship and loyalty for years to come.

Pair up young advisers with young clients. Quinn said pairing up your clients’ children with your firm’s younger advisers would also be helpful. It would get that next-generation business in the door, while giving your next-generation advisers some valuable experience.

“Younger investors like to have a cultural similarity with the advisers that they’re working with,” Quinn said.

Be a savvy communicator. Quinn encourages planners to utilize technology to make a positive impression. She noted that the next generation of clients will do a Google search on you, and you want to be sure that what they find is appealing. Also, note that this generation probably doesn’t prefer phone calls, but rather emails and texts.

“If you do have clients whose children you want to make meaningful connections with,” Quinn said, “determine the most effective way to initiate engagement and establish a strategy for sustaining engagement.”


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4 Questions to Attract More Clients

There are just four questions that every financial adviser must answer if they want to attract more clients. If you can answer these questions, you’ll be able to more effectively communicate your message to prospects so that they will want to work with you.

No. 1: Who’s Your Ideal Client?

When advisers think about their business and how they help people, they tend to think the most about the services they provide. Things like the types of planning they offer, the investments and products they use for clients, the process they walk clients through, etc., but we rarely focus on defining who we serve.

The financial advisers that will survive and thrive over the long term will define their business not by the service they offer but by the people they serve.

They know exactly who their ideal client is.

No. 2: What Value Do You Provide?

You undoubtedly provide a lot of great advice to your clients. But what do your clients value the most? What’s most important to them?

Do they care about investment selection, the products, the process, your credentials, your years of experience or your past performance? I’m sure they do.

But there’s actually only one thing that your clients value above all else: their transformation.

They are seeking the positive change they experience by working with you. They want the end result. How do I know this? It’s because people buy the destination, not the plane ride.

What is the destination your clients are trying to get to? What’s the ideal end result you can help them achieve? This is the real value you give to clients and prospects.

No. 3: How Do You Clearly Communicate Your Value?

If you’re the greatest financial adviser in the world but you don’t know how to clearly communicate your value to ideal prospects, then you won’t be in business very long. If you cannot clearly communicate your value to people, nothing else you’re doing in your business really matters.

Many good advisers have failed because they didn’t know how to clearly communicate their value.

The best advisers are able to engage in a conversation with a complete stranger and within two minutes, that stranger fully understands how that adviser helps people. Even better, that stranger will have enough curiosity and excitement that they want to hear more from the adviser.

If you’re able to naturally start the conversation with people, you’ll have no trouble getting people in the door. And If you can communicate your value, you’ll have no problem getting people to become your clients.

No. 4: How Will You Consistently Attract and Acquire New Clients?

This is the most important question that advisers need to answer. It’s also the one most advisers have a hard time answering.

How do you find new clients? Most advisers rely on referrals to get new business. Some others still do seminars, lunches, cold calling and networking events. Those techniques are good but there are more and more advisers turning to newer ways of attracting prospects to them. Techniques such Linkedin referrals, Facebook ads, blogging and webinars are quickly growing in favor with advisers. This is because they are less expensive and more profitable than the “old school” ways of getting new clients. But there’s also a steep learning curve to these. You shouldn’t let that stop you from testing them out. When you find the technique that works for you, stick with it and focus all your energy there.

Take five minutes and try to answer these four questions. And be honest with yourself. If you’re having trouble with one of the questions, start exploring new ways to try and answer it. If you need ideas, download the accompanying guide to help you out.

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Dave Zoller, CFP®
Financial Adviser
Streamline My Practice
Warrenville, IL


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All Business is Personal: 3 Tips for Addressing Difficult Client Conversations

“Hi Jim. I wanted to inform you that your funds will be transitioning from an A share to a C share, which means you will actually pay less in fund fees, however, my fee cost will be increasing just a big. Let’s set up a time to discuss.”

Now there’s an email nobody wants to send or receive. As the financial industry evolves and advisers are held to an increasingly higher standard, you may have to take a new approach to difficult conversations with your clients. The ability to engage clients in these discussions is critical in building and retaining a successful practice.

Here are three tips based on the research of G. Richard Shell, award-winning author and creator of the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School’s “Success Course,” on how to better approach challenging conversations and ensure you’re creating Demonstrations of Value (DOVs).

Talk About Client Goals First
When times are tough, take a positive approach by focusing on their goals while still acknowledging the concern. For example, you could say, “I know you set up this portfolio to save for Katie’s college education. She’s starting high school next year, so we still have four years until tuition starts. I know the markets have been rough, but I believe we’ll still be able to achieve your goal. Here’s why.”

By leading the conversation with knowledge of your client’s specific needs and concerns, you can better address the need to maintain an objective view throughout market challenges and not let emotions cloud a commitment to a longer-term strategy.

Help Them See the Big Picture
Your client comes to you with big news. She and her husband are ready to buy that house on Lake Winnipesaukee they’ve been talking about for years. While you share her enthusiasm, you want to make sure that she’s putting this decision into context.

During this conversation, you have an opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge of your client’s plans and needs. How long do they plan to own this house? Will they need to consider space for additional family members later on? Is this where they’d like to retire one day? If yes, how does that fit into their overall retirement plan?

When you help them consider the questions that matter, you reinforce your value more deeply than their investment positions. You can help be a leader when it comes to a family’s important life decisions.

It’s About More Than Money
Get to know your clients beyond their portfolio. While it may seem obvious, occasionally our time gets the best of us and we don’t focus on the details that could make a difference.

Keep notes on their hobbies and interests, where their priorities are, how old their kids are and family anniversaries and birthdays. Knowing these specifics can help foster a relationship that goes beyond just business, creating a partnership that can withstand even the toughest financial environments.

Are you ready to demonstrate your value in a collaborative client relationship? For more tips on how to boost your communication skills, learn about the 3Cs to enhance your negotiation skills.

JohnEvans

 

John Evans
Executive Director, Janus Labs
Janus Capital Group
Denver, CO


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5 Steps to ‘Connecting the Room’

One of life’s simple pleasures for me is something that others might dread: public speaking. For more than 20 years I’ve had the honor and privilege to speak in front of a wide range of audiences—investors, financial advisers, insurance agents and wholesalers.

A rookie financial adviser client of mine explained that he had held his first seminar and it had resulted in setting several appointments with qualified prospects. However, he was disappointed overall because he said that the audience barely said a word during his entire presentation. Even when he would ask them a question or attempt to interact with them, the room was silent.

If this has ever happened to you, please know that it happens to most speakers at some point in their careers. To combat that challenge, I’ve developed a solution that I refer to as “connecting the room.” If you apply this technique, I’m pretty sure you will never just hear crickets during your presentation again.

The following is a step-by-step process for connecting the room.

Step 1: Ask Strategic Questions

It’s no secret that the audience tends to be more engaged at listening when you ask them questions. That’s why it’s important to map out your questions prior to your presentation so that you have a strategy ahead of time.

Typically, I tend to start off a new subject with a question. An example of this was years ago when I prepared one set of questions for each section of my presentation. Instead of reading the Power Point slide titled “Inflation Eats up Your Purchasing Power,” I simply asked a strategic question to the group of retirees, which was, “How many people here paid more for their last car then they did their first house?”

Step 2: Get the Audience to Take Action

Another great way to help the audience connect with one another is to collectively ask them to take action by raising their hand. After I asked the earlier question, I paused and said, “Let’s see a show of hands of who can relate to that. Please raise your hand if you can.”

Immediately, several hands went up.

Step 3: Make a Connection

Next, pick out one person who seems to be paying attention or actively listening so that you can ask them to tell their story to the crowd. Ask, “What is your name?” then simply turn the dialogue over to them by saying something like, “Joe, when did you buy your first house? What type of home was it (ex: rambler, townhouse, split-level, etc.)? Was it here in town or somewhere else?” Let this individual share the limelight for a moment then continue asking a few more questions. Examples might be, “What was the biggest purchase item aside from your home that you bought?” and “Do you think you the prices for items like that will continue to rise?” Your final question should be a closed-ended question which elicits a “yes” or a “no” so you can emphasize your point. Finish the interaction by thanking the person, “Joe, thanks for sharing! Who here can relate to Joe’s story? Let’s see a show of hands.”

Step 4: Connect the Room

Usually a group tends to listen more intently when a speaker is dynamic and uses dialogue, versus a speaker who is static and utilizes a monologue. If you sprinkle in interactions throughout your presentation, your audience will be waiting for them. Use as many as you can—as time permits—to solidify your messaging and to strengthen your connection with those in the room.

Step 5: Make Your Point

Before moving on from one topic to another be sure to ask a summarizing question. Here is an example, “Does anyone know why things are more expensive today than they were when you bought your first house?” Let someone offer an answer and then explain your point of view. You could say something like, “The reason things are more expensive is because inflation eats up your purchasing power!”

Transitioning from one topic to another is often the best time to engage with the audience and have the group collectively relate to each other. Be sure your questions are catered to the demographic to which you are speaking and that the questions support your point of view.

Why Connecting the Room Works

When you use this technique, watch what happens to the people in the room, they speak more freely and are more apt to want to speak with you afterwards and hopefully they are on their way to becoming one of your clients. If they feel comfortable then they feel connected!

To schedule a complimentary 30-minute coaching session with me at, email Melissa Denham, director of client servicing at Advisor Solutions.

Dan Finley

 

Daniel C. Finley
President
Advisor Solutions
St. Paul, Minn.