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3 Levels of Trust and Why They Matter

In this year—2017—there is a “crisis of trust.”

So says the 2017 Edelman Trust Barometer, an annual global trust survey. Not since the study began tracking trust among the global population have they found such a broad decline in trust in all four key institutions—business, government, non-governmental organizations and media.

The 2016 survey noted that financial services are the least trusted industry of any they surveyed.

With the fall of trust, the majority of respondents now don’t believe that the system is working for them. In this climate, people’s societal and economic concerns turn into fears, spurring the rise of populist actions which have played out across the globe.

Such is the importance of forging trust among your clients. When it comes to trust there are three levels and advisers should know each one in order to be more trustworthy in the eyes of your clients.

As the chair of financial and legal innovation at ForbesBooks, and as a former financial coach, I’ve spent a lot of time focusing on the issue of trust. Trust is the foundation of the financial adviser–client relationship. We all know that. It’s particularly crucial when somebody is in a vulnerable position and with family and health, finances are among the most vulnerable areas we have.

Trust is a powerful intangible asset, defined differently by each client. Allen Harris, CEO of Berkshire Money Management, Inc., said that when it comes to the adviser-client relationship, trust is sometimes a too-easily-earned commodity. Clients want to trust their adviser and sometimes do so unquestioningly.

“Unfortunately, financial advisers don’t have to do much to earn that initial trust,” Harris said in a recent interview. “The client needs help and believes that someone with a shingle has their best interest at heart.”

study by the Wharton School looked at three levels of trust between advisers and clients. The first is trust in knowhow. Investors are looking for someone whose competence inspires trust. This first level addresses the question, “Do you know what you’re doing?”

“Many people find advisers by way of referral, so they feel they can trust the adviser because someone else trusts them,” Harris told us in a recent interview. “But why did that first person trust the adviser? Maybe the adviser did something to earn that trust, but maybe not. Clients get lucky a lot, because most every adviser is a good person who means to do good. But like in any profession, that’s not always true. So the client rationalizes trust by a gut feeling, a referral or a slick brochure.”

The second level is trust in ethical conduct. This level addresses the question, “Do I trust you not to steal money from me?”

“If you are trying to protect from embezzlement, that’s easy,” Harris said. “You want a public held, highly regulated, closely scrutinized custodian of your assets. Then the client always has the access to and the ability to view their money.”

If the client is trying to protect from malpractice, one big problem is that the SEC and FINRA do not allow investment performance. Don’t get me wrong—investment performance isn’t the thing that should be a deciding factor, but it should be a benchmark to be sure clients make money when the market goes up but also that the adviser is proactive in protecting the portfolios during down times. That’s the type of referral you really want.”

The third level of trust is trust in empathetic skills. This level addresses the question, “Do you care about me?” There is no formula for this one. CNBC sites a study released by the CFA Institute which shows that so-called soft skills—typically things such as relationship-building and interpersonal communication—will be more important than technical skills in the coming years.

These attributes—a proven track record, an ethical reputation and sincere empathy—inspire trust on all three levels. For financial advisers, trust is not simply a nice thing to have, but a critical strategic asset.

Harper Tucker
Harper Tucker is the chair of Financial and Legal Innovation Practice and vice-president of Authority Marketing, a leading the author acquisition process for ForbesBooks and Advantage Media Group


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5 Signs It’s Time to Move On from a Prospect

Have you ever had a high net worth prospect who seemed semi-interested in working with you but you just couldn’t quite get them off the fence? You’ve called several times; maybe you’ve even met with them and offered recommendations, but something is holding them back from taking that final step to becoming a client. Then, your prospecting efforts become unreturned voicemails or vague replies to your emails. If this sounds familiar, maybe it’s time to acknowledge the signs and realize it’s time to move on.

Following is a brief overview of what I tell my clients to look for and how to know when to let go.

Sign No. 1: A Family Member in the Business

Most experienced advisers and agents know that when a prospect says, “I have a brother in-law in the business but I’d be interested in hearing what you have to say,” it probably means that they don’t completely trust their relative, however it doesn’t guarantee that they’d change anything. Instead, they most likely will consider your recommendations, talk it over with their relative and still not end up working with you. The reason is because relatives are just too awkward to walk away from when it comes to business dealings.

If you run across this type of prospect, qualify them right away by saying something like this, “If we identify some need for changes in your portfolio, are you in a position to do business with me?” This will help you identify how serious they are about working with you.

Sign No. 2: Wanting to Split their Business

Some prospects may like your recommendations but not want to sever ties with their current adviser or agent. The reason is simple, it’s because they are familiar and have established trust with that person. They don’t know you but they might consider working with you on a trial basis.

Unfortunately, many times they are doing this with the caveat that they can compare results and then let go of the adviser/agent that doesn’t do as well for them. If this scenario is offered—working with you to “see what happens”—it’s important for you to reply like this, “I’m sorry but the clients I work with need to provide reasonable time for my process and recommendations to come to fruition.” When you stand by your value, you may lose a prospect now and again but you maintain your self-respect. As a result, you also build a better client base.

Sign No. 3: They Took Your Recommendations and Bought Online

Years ago, I had a prospect take several of my recommendations and purchase them in an online account. He felt there was nothing wrong with it since it saved him money. I on the other hand believe that if the relationship starts off on the wrong foot, it will end up remaining that way. This type of prospect is merely showing you that they don’t value your services. If this happens, you need to be ready to walk away.

Sign No. 4: You are Chasing a Ghost

At some point, you will have a prospect that needs to “think about it” or “review things.” When you follow-up they may not return your calls. The reason is because they didn’t see the value in your recommendations in the first place.

There may have been a concern or objection that you didn’t address. If this happens, simply leave a message like this, “Hi ______, this is _______ with _______. I have a quick question that only you can answer. Could you please call me when you hear this? My number is _________.” This is what I refer to as the “curiosity message.” If they aren’t curious enough to call you back, they really aren’t interested in doing business with you. If they do call, you need to ask them something directly like, “Are you still interested in (insert three benefits here).” If they are, then set another appointment with them to do the paperwork.

Sign No. 5: You Just Don’t Like the Prospect

If you find yourself dreading any type of communication with a specific prospect (email, phone call or appointments) then you certainly do not want to work with them. No matter how much business you think they can provide, inform them that you might not be an appropriate fit and they could be better served by someone who could provide more of what they are looking for.

Why Watching for Warning Signs is Important

This is not an easy business but when you make a conscious choice to work with people who want to work with you, you can make things much easier on yourself. That’s why it is so important to watch for warning signs that it’s time to move on from a prospect. Life is too short to chase those who don’t see your value.

If you are ready to take your business to the next level, schedule a complimentary 30-minute coaching session with me by emailing Melissa Denham, director of client servicing.

Dan Finley
 Daniel C. Finley is the president and co-founder of Advisor Solutions, a business consulting and coaching service dedicated to helping advisers build a better business.

 

 


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Be A Gen Savvy Planner: Take Off Your Generational Lenses

Our early environments shape us for the rest of our lives.

That’s why there is so much difference between the generations, said Cam Marston, an expert on generational change and founder of Generational Insights.

Marston told FPA Retreat attendees in April that baby boomers are tough and were never told they were unique or special, so they overcompensated by telling their kids—who are Gen-Xers and millennials—that they were extra special. Therefore, those two generations were raised to think they were unique and that their needs were very important.

“What imprints on younger people impacts them for the rest of their lives,” Marston said. “Millennials and Gen-X have been brought up to say, ‘What’s going to make me happy?’

Planners should understand the vast differences between the generations and know how to talk to and communicate with each one.

Boomers. To connect with the boomer, Marston said, you need to understand how they see the world. They’re hardworking and they have the mentality that retirement is going to be great. They want to hear your story and know where you come from.

Hanging up your diplomas or certificates in your office during your meetings with boomers is a good idea.

Key points about boomers:

1.) Understand and acknowledge their work ethic—which they generally measure in hours (i.e., “I work 50-60 hours a week”).

2.) Ask them about their accomplishments and acknowledge what they’ve done.

3.) Communicate that you are on the same page. Emphasize that you are a team.

5.) Pick up the phone and call them and meet with them in person.

6.) Beware of too much technology.

7.) Know the difference between “leading” baby boomers (older than 62 and like communication that emphasizes how they deserve retirement); and “trailing” baby boomers (ages 53-61 and need to be reassured that they’re going to be OK despite setbacks they experienced in retirement savings thanks to the recession).

Gen-Xers. This generation are stalkers of product and services. They demand to be an educated consumer and are leery of “being had,” Marston said. They are interested in how well you can teach them to make a good decision. Your relationship should be a partnership.

Key points about Gen-Xers:

1.) They are going to do research and have you prove why your advice is better than what they found via this research.

2.) They tend to prefer email and your communication should be brief, succinct and to the point.

3.) Don’t waste your time leaving them voicemails.

4.) Make sure your web presence is pristine—they’ll look you up online before contacting you.

5.) The Gen-X mother has tremendous buying power and influence. She’s coming up in terms of her earning, she’s informed and she’s fully engaged. Keep her happy.

6.) Communicate how decisions will affect them personally.

Millennials. Millennials are individuals with a group orientation. They believe they’re unique but they also enjoy being part of a group.

Millennials think, “You tell me about me and what’s going to happen and how I’m going to feel about it,” Marston said.

Key points about millennials:

1.) They’re optimistic.

2.) You will get more attendance from them if you ask them to bring people. Engage them as a group and they will be more interested.

3.) They feel they are unique and special.

4.) They don’t think so much in the long-term as the other generations.

5.) They are achieving milestones (i.e., getting married, buying houses, having kids) later in life than the previous generations.

6.) Communicate via text messages and social media.

Understand these key points about each generation and try to see the world through their eyes when you’re talking to them.

“Everybody pitches and articulates their value from their own generational lense,” Marston said, “but I’ve got to take my lenses off and put on somebody else’s.”

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Ana Trujillo Limón is associate editor of the Journal of Financial Planning and the editor of the FPA Practice Management Blog. Email her at alimon@onefpa.org


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The Power of Wow

After her particularly stellar basketball season, John Evans, Jr., Ed.D., took his 10-year-old daughter for a trip to the Sarasota, Fla. Ritz Carlton.

On the elevator ride up to their room, he praised her rebounding, her boxing out, her shooting. They settled in, left the hotel, and came back to their room to find a tiny chocolate cake with a message on top reading, “Congratulations on the great season, Susana.”

The bellman had heard the entire conversation and seized the opportunity to give these two guests what Evans refers to as a “wow moment.” He defines this as a unique, emotionally engaging experience that goes beyond expectations and is readily recounted.

Evans, executive director of Janus Henderson Labs of Janus Henderson Investors (formerly Janus Capital Group), told FPA Retreat attendees in April 2017, that generating wow moments for a great client experience, like the one he had at the Ritz Carlton, starts with energy levels, is followed by clarifying your purpose, and ends with expanding your team’s capacity to deliver authentic wow moments (read more about “wow moments” straight from Evans in the June 20 FPA Practice Management Blog post titled, “The Circle of WOW”).

“We have an energy crisis here, ladies and gentleman,” Evans said. “But here is the thing: we can create more energy.”

Evans noted that there are four areas on the energy pyramid: the physical (the fundamental source of fuel, sleep); emotional (the capacity to manage emotions); mental (capacity to organize and focus attention); and spiritual (the purpose beyond self-interest). Of those, we are most stressed in the mental and emotional.

But, Evans noted, stress isn’t always bad.

“Stress is the giver of life,” Evans said. “A life of pillows and marshmallows is no way to live.”

Evans notes that a way to generate more energy in all areas of the pyramid is to embrace stress and abolish multitasking, which he said is “one of the greatest enemies of extraordinary and the pathway to mediocrity.”

It’s counterfeit engagement, he said, and we all need to become more engaged. Focus on one thing at a time, establish healthy habits such as eating right and exercising, and see if your energy levels improve.

Next, advisers must clarify their purpose. Why do you do what you do? What is your purpose? Your cause? Your belief? Actively communicate that from the inside out.

Finally, appoint a “wow czar” or “chief clientologist” whose job it is to help generate these experiences. This person should have tremendous emotional intelligence and be creative.

“We have to be intentional about wow,” Evans said.

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Ana Trujillo Limón is associate editor of the Journal of Financial Planning and the editor of the FPA Practice Management Blog. Email her at alimon@onefpa.org


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4 Questions to Attract More Clients

There are just four questions that every financial adviser must answer if they want to attract more clients. If you can answer these questions, you’ll be able to more effectively communicate your message to prospects so that they will want to work with you.

No. 1: Who’s Your Ideal Client?

When advisers think about their business and how they help people, they tend to think the most about the services they provide. Things like the types of planning they offer, the investments and products they use for clients, the process they walk clients through, etc., but we rarely focus on defining who we serve.

The financial advisers that will survive and thrive over the long term will define their business not by the service they offer but by the people they serve.

They know exactly who their ideal client is.

No. 2: What Value Do You Provide?

You undoubtedly provide a lot of great advice to your clients. But what do your clients value the most? What’s most important to them?

Do they care about investment selection, the products, the process, your credentials, your years of experience or your past performance? I’m sure they do.

But there’s actually only one thing that your clients value above all else: their transformation.

They are seeking the positive change they experience by working with you. They want the end result. How do I know this? It’s because people buy the destination, not the plane ride.

What is the destination your clients are trying to get to? What’s the ideal end result you can help them achieve? This is the real value you give to clients and prospects.

No. 3: How Do You Clearly Communicate Your Value?

If you’re the greatest financial adviser in the world but you don’t know how to clearly communicate your value to ideal prospects, then you won’t be in business very long. If you cannot clearly communicate your value to people, nothing else you’re doing in your business really matters.

Many good advisers have failed because they didn’t know how to clearly communicate their value.

The best advisers are able to engage in a conversation with a complete stranger and within two minutes, that stranger fully understands how that adviser helps people. Even better, that stranger will have enough curiosity and excitement that they want to hear more from the adviser.

If you’re able to naturally start the conversation with people, you’ll have no trouble getting people in the door. And If you can communicate your value, you’ll have no problem getting people to become your clients.

No. 4: How Will You Consistently Attract and Acquire New Clients?

This is the most important question that advisers need to answer. It’s also the one most advisers have a hard time answering.

How do you find new clients? Most advisers rely on referrals to get new business. Some others still do seminars, lunches, cold calling and networking events. Those techniques are good but there are more and more advisers turning to newer ways of attracting prospects to them. Techniques such Linkedin referrals, Facebook ads, blogging and webinars are quickly growing in favor with advisers. This is because they are less expensive and more profitable than the “old school” ways of getting new clients. But there’s also a steep learning curve to these. You shouldn’t let that stop you from testing them out. When you find the technique that works for you, stick with it and focus all your energy there.

Take five minutes and try to answer these four questions. And be honest with yourself. If you’re having trouble with one of the questions, start exploring new ways to try and answer it. If you need ideas, download the accompanying guide to help you out.

dave-zoller

 

Dave Zoller, CFP®
Financial Adviser
Streamline My Practice
Warrenville, IL


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Education—The Missing Piece of the Investor Success Puzzle

Being a good financial adviser requires mastery of a wide range of technical skills. Being a great financial adviser requires having skills as a counselor and psychologist. Being an outstanding financial adviser requires developing your skills as a teacher. Here’s why.

The job of a financial adviser is to help each client get from Point A (where they are today) to Point B (where they want/need to be at some point in the future). The question is always how to maximize the chance that the client will arrive safely and securely at Point B.

When I first entered the financial services industry, the focus was on the technical aspects of this journey. Advisers used their financial planning and investment skills to define and plot the course from Point A to Point B.

Later, the focus broadened to include another dimension of the problem. Supporting clients emotionally and coaxing them to do the right thing has always been part of the job. But our understanding of the importance of that aspect of advising clients changed when research from the world of behavioral finance entered the mainstream.

Soon we were awash in new jargon that labeled each quirk in the vast inventory of our financial decision-making dysfunctions. A tsunami of information familiarized us with the basic concepts of behavioral finance, but left us unsure about what, exactly, to do with this information.

One exception is the area of risk tolerance. A host of service providers emerged with products that purport to help us measure the risk tolerance of our clients. But what should you do when there is a significant gap between a client’s need to take risk and their comfort in doing so?

Say you have a client that has done a poor job of saving over the years. The client has no choice but to be aggressive in their investment strategy if he is to have any hope of meeting his goals. But what if his tolerance for risk is very low? Do you ignore the client’s discomfort with risk-taking or do you dial down the portfolio in favor of a smoother ride?

Actually, this is a false dilemma. It assumes that the client’s risk tolerance is a fixed feature like the nose on his face. This is simply not true. Soldiers learn to fight with bullets whizzing by their heads. Athletes learn to maintain their focus in the midst of chaos. Clients can be taught to better weather the inevitable storms they will encounter. Education is the key.

Most advisers are comfortable answering client questions about investing, but this level of education is reactive and event driven. Exhorting clients to “think long-term” and “stay the course” is not education, it’s sloganeering.

Being a good investor requires a solid frame of reference. Clients need to know what to expect and why things happen the way they do. They need that course we all should have had in school, but never did. Providing this level of education requires thought, planning and a proactive approach. But like soldiers and athletes, clients can be trained to be better, more confident investors.

If you want your clients to make it successfully from Point A to Point B, you should put as much time into teaching them about the journey as you do developing financial plans and investment solutions for them.

scott-mackillop

 

Scott MacKillop
CEO
First Ascent Asset Management
Denver, CO


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All Business is Personal: 3 Tips for Addressing Difficult Client Conversations

“Hi Jim. I wanted to inform you that your funds will be transitioning from an A share to a C share, which means you will actually pay less in fund fees, however, my fee cost will be increasing just a big. Let’s set up a time to discuss.”

Now there’s an email nobody wants to send or receive. As the financial industry evolves and advisers are held to an increasingly higher standard, you may have to take a new approach to difficult conversations with your clients. The ability to engage clients in these discussions is critical in building and retaining a successful practice.

Here are three tips based on the research of G. Richard Shell, award-winning author and creator of the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School’s “Success Course,” on how to better approach challenging conversations and ensure you’re creating Demonstrations of Value (DOVs).

Talk About Client Goals First
When times are tough, take a positive approach by focusing on their goals while still acknowledging the concern. For example, you could say, “I know you set up this portfolio to save for Katie’s college education. She’s starting high school next year, so we still have four years until tuition starts. I know the markets have been rough, but I believe we’ll still be able to achieve your goal. Here’s why.”

By leading the conversation with knowledge of your client’s specific needs and concerns, you can better address the need to maintain an objective view throughout market challenges and not let emotions cloud a commitment to a longer-term strategy.

Help Them See the Big Picture
Your client comes to you with big news. She and her husband are ready to buy that house on Lake Winnipesaukee they’ve been talking about for years. While you share her enthusiasm, you want to make sure that she’s putting this decision into context.

During this conversation, you have an opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge of your client’s plans and needs. How long do they plan to own this house? Will they need to consider space for additional family members later on? Is this where they’d like to retire one day? If yes, how does that fit into their overall retirement plan?

When you help them consider the questions that matter, you reinforce your value more deeply than their investment positions. You can help be a leader when it comes to a family’s important life decisions.

It’s About More Than Money
Get to know your clients beyond their portfolio. While it may seem obvious, occasionally our time gets the best of us and we don’t focus on the details that could make a difference.

Keep notes on their hobbies and interests, where their priorities are, how old their kids are and family anniversaries and birthdays. Knowing these specifics can help foster a relationship that goes beyond just business, creating a partnership that can withstand even the toughest financial environments.

Are you ready to demonstrate your value in a collaborative client relationship? For more tips on how to boost your communication skills, learn about the 3Cs to enhance your negotiation skills.

JohnEvans

 

John Evans
Executive Director, Janus Labs
Janus Capital Group
Denver, CO