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5 Steps to Run Your Business with Positive Intention

Years ago, when I was a rookie, I was running out to an appointment with a client I was hoping to close, when a colleague wished me good luck. My immediate response was, “Thanks, but he’ll probably have to think about it.” My peer replied, “You’re right—if you go into the meeting with that intention.”

On the ride to the appointment I thought about what my co-worker had said and realized that I needed to run my business by going into each phone call and every appointment with a vision of a successful outcome rather than with my existing, less enthusiastic mindset. I quickly changed my focus—which had been negative—and instead worked on how to handle any possible objections that might arise during the appointment.

The result was one of the smoothest presentations (and closes) I’d ever experienced. Afterward, I made the connection: the reason my meeting went so well wasn’t because my change in focus was attracting success but because I went into the appointment expecting success.

The following are the steps I’ve used in many situations, in business and life, to increase my probability of success. Apply these steps and watch how your business and life can transform for the better.

Step 1: Believe in the outcome you want. When I look back at the aforementioned story, I realize now (20 years later) that although I knew I wanted to close that prospect, I didn’t believe that I would. Knowing what outcome you want and believing in your ability to achieve that outcome can be two entirely different thought processes. That’s why it’s so important to address any doubts you have by asking yourself, “What is the evidence that this is true?” And, in my case the follow-up question was simply, “Have I ever closed a prospect before? If I’ve done it once I can do it a thousand times more.” By questioning a negative belief system you are in fact decreasing its validity and increasing your own belief in yourself.

 Step 2: Know where you are now. On the ride to that particular appointment I had a revelation that I needed to run my business with intention. Up to that point I’d actually run my business by winging it. Believe me, I’ve coached hundreds of financial advisers and insurance agents since 2004 and one thing I learned early on is that winging it doesn’t work. That is why you need to get crystal clear on where you are now and where you desire to be. In other words, what have you been doing that has been preventing you from reaching your full potential?

For me, it was taking the time to prepare recommendations while neglecting to prepare for the presentation and any objections.

Step 3: Decide what to do and do it. That appointment was a turning point in my career because I realized that people don’t want to be corrected, they want to be connected. In other words, people don’t like to be told they have been doing something wrong with their investment strategy but they do what to know that you care about them and that you have their best interest at heart. In order to show them that, you need to ask questions to help prospects see that they have a challenge (if they do) and to realize that you have the solution.

So, I decided that I would focus on having a process for my presentations, ask better questions and lead them down a path to understand what value I could offer them.

Step 4: Prepare for possible pushbacks. In business, as well as life, we’re all faced with the possibility of pushbacks, those unforeseen obstacles that prevent us from reaching our desired results. In the case of presenting the prospect with recommendations, it’s highly likely that they will have objections. That’s why I decided to study a process (and actually develop a system) to handle any type of objection. When you prepare for possible pushback, you increase your likelihood of success because you are ready for the inevitable obstacles.

Step 5: Evaluate the process. A simple barometer for understanding how well your process is working is to observe the results you’re seeing (or not seeing). If you’re obtaining your desired results, than keep doing what you are doing, but if not it’s time to go back to the beginning and start over at step one.

Why Positive Intentions Work

The more often you go into any situation with an intentional, positive attitude and a plan, the more likely that it will become a habit. If you begin each interaction knowing what you want to happen, believe in the outcome and prepare your dialogue for inevitable objections and you will no doubt increase your probability for success. The reason why running your business with positive intentions works is because it’s the antithesis of “winging it” or leaving your business up to chance. Instead, expect success by preparing to succeed.

Schedule a complimentary 30-minute coaching session with me by emailing Melissa Denham, director of client servicing.

Dan Finley
Daniel C. Finley is the president and co-founder of Advisor Solutions, a business consulting and coaching service dedicated to helping advisers build a better business.


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Taking the Emergency Brake Off

Fear has an ugly way of stopping many advisers in their tracks. Fear of failure, fear of success (yes, even that) and fear of the unknown can leave you driving with the emergency brake on, slowing your pace and forcing you to work harder.

For advisers and agents who let fear affect how they manage their tasks, they shouldn’t focus so much on eliminating fear altogether but more on illuminating fear. Advisers and agents should try to understand how some of their beliefs or fears hold them and their advisory business from reaching a greater level. If this sounds like something you’re experiencing, you are not the first to experience this sometimes paralyzing crossroad. However, this post can teach you how to take that emergency brake off and put motivation and momentum back into your daily activities.

5 Steps to Overcoming Fear

The following are steps are for overcoming fear—both in your personal and professional lives. Apply each step when you are faced with a situation where you experience fear and/or anxiety and watch how quickly you can conquer it.

Step 1: Gain Emotional Awareness. Rick T. is a veteran financial adviser client of mine with 20 years of experience. He called late on a Friday afternoon concerned about a situation in which he’d emailed one client another client’s information by accident. The two clients have the same first name, so it was a simple mistake of typing the first name in the “to” box of his outgoing email. I asked him how he felt about what happened in order to give him a chance to identify and articulate his emotional awareness.

Step 2: Realize and Release. He was fearful and anxious because his compliance department was the one who notified him of the error. Unfortunately, it had occurred several other times this year so he was even more concerned about what this could mean for him. His mind was racing towards the worst-case scenario.

Putting into words how you feel and why is a great beginning. You need to let yourself recognize the fear and/or anxiety so you can work through it. It will release itself over time and you will feel better, but it’s important to sensibly talk through the situation with someone you trust until you find a stronger sense of calm.

Step 3: Get the Facts. It didn’t take Rick long to start thinking and getting worked up again about the situation. It’s common to keep experiencing the original emotion as most people’s mind tends to wander, ruminate and head back toward doubt, so I helped him refocus his thoughts by explaining the facts.

I’ve been in the financial services industry for 24 years—both as a financial adviser and a coach—and I’ve never, ever heard of anyone getting fired for sending out emails to the wrong client.

Step 4: Form a Plan and Take Action. Rick quickly asked me what he should do and we formed a plan and mapped out what he should say to his compliance department. When we hung up, he acted and made the call. By preparing for that call, we in fact refocused his energy toward something that he could control—which was trying to rectify the situation.

Step 5: Repeat the Process. It didn’t take long before Rick called me back, informing me that his compliance department was helpful and reminded him to slow down and double check when sending out any correspondence. I recommended to him that he repeat the process we used with this specific event for any situation that arose in the future that served up fear and anxiety for him.

Why Taking the Emergency Brake off Works

When Rick realized that he didn’t have to run from the fear, but instead embrace and face it, he felt empowered with hope (and equipped with a coping mechanism for bringing him to a calmer state). We all become reactive to some extent in these types of situations. That’s why taking the emergency brake off works, it takes you out of focusing on the immediate fear and allows you to focus on the process to hopefully remedy the outcome and move in the right direction.

If you are ready to take your business to the next level, schedule a complimentary 30-minute coaching session with me by emailing Melissa Denham, director of client servicing.

Dan Finley
Daniel C. Finley is the president and co-founder of Advisor Solutions, a business consulting and coaching service dedicated to helping advisers build a better business.

 


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These Tips Can Help Advisers Attract—and Keep—High Net Worth Clients

By Robert Powell, MarketWatch.com

For many advisers, high net worth individuals or households — those with more than $1 million in investible assets — are a kind of Holy Grail.

The reasons are clear. HWNIs, which represent just 0.7 percent of the world’s adult population but own 45.2 percent of the wealth, are good for business. They’re highly profitable and loyal, according to Rebecca Li-Huang, a wealth adviser at HSBC, who wrote a chapter in the June 2017 book Financial Behavior: Players, Services, Products, and Markets.

Consider: An adviser can earn one-half of 1 percent of assets under management on a $10 million account, say $50,000 a year. By contrast, the very same adviser would earn only $1,000 a year on a $100,000 account. For financial advisers, the attraction should be obvious.

But there’s more to the story, and advisers should get to know the psychology of HNWIs before taking them on as clients. Just like regular folks, Li-Huang wrote, they are prone to behavioral biases and judgment errors, not perfectly rational, utility-maximizing, unemotional homo economicus.

In short, wrote Li-Huang, they are humans. And in the U.S., according to Li-Huang, they often share a particular way of thinking about what they want from their money that financial advisers should consider when trying to serve them.

American HNWIs like to direct their investment according to their personal beliefs and values, and they play a large role in public life through philanthropy and politics, according to Li-Huang. And many want to leave a legacy by giving back to society while generating a financial return on their investments.

“The holistic returns on cultural, environmental, social, and political causes are gaining importance in wealth management,” wrote Li-Huang. “The trend toward helping HNWIs address their personal aspirations and social-impact needs is part of a broader wealth management industry transition toward giving holistic wealth advice.”

Focus on goals while mitigating stress

How can advisers do that? For starters, according to Li-Huang, advisers can focus on goals-based financial planning, holistic wealth management, and services that address investments, lending, tax and estate planning, insurance, philanthropy, and succession planning.

With goals-based planning, wrote Li-Huang, success is measured by how clients are progressing toward their personalized goals rather than against a benchmark index such as the S&P 500 stock index. (Publicly traded securities don’t necessarily contribute that much to a HNWI’s wealth, notes Li-Huang, as just one in eight millionaires say equities were an important factor in their economic success.)

Still, she argues, HNWIs do need to invest in diversified markets and use tax-efficient strategies. And advisers can add value by “mitigating psychological costs, such as reducing anxiety rather than improving investment performance” and by focusing on financial planning and advice on savings and asset allocation.

Li-Huang cited research that suggests that investors don’t necessarily want the best risk-adjusted returns but, rather, the best returns they can achieve for the level of stress they have to experience, or what some call anxiety-adjusted returns.

In the cast of HNWIs, they tend to practice something called “emotional inoculation.” They outsource the part of the investment decision-making that induces stress, according to Li-Huang.

HNWIs are especially looking to their wealth manager for help with philanthropy. They are looking for “support and advice, such as setting goals and defining their personal role in their areas of interest, identifying and structuring investments, and measuring outcomes of their social impact efforts,” she wrote.

Given that advisers need to provide their HNWI clients with tax and philanthropy specialists.

In advisers they trust

When HNWIs consider selecting an adviser, they tend to focus more on honesty and trustworthiness than past investment performance or standard professional credentials, according to Li-Huang.

That’s not to say that professional credentials and competence don’t matter — they do — but, rather, that they are not sufficient in and of themselves, according to Li-Huang.

HNWIs — who tend to have less time and resources for due diligence than typical clients of financial advisers — use something called “trust heuristics” when searching for an adviser with whom to work.

In other words, they’re even more likely to assume that the category leaders are among the best in a highly regulated world even as they hold advisers referred by family members, friends and acquaintances in high regard, according to Li-Huang.

Consequently, perhaps, HNWIs tend to trust their advisers much more than less wealthy retail investor trust their financial advisers.

So, what is trust to a HNWI? According to Li-Huang, HNWis trust advisers who show signs that they’re acting in the client’s best interest, reach out proactively, charge reasonable fees, deliver mistake-free work — and admit when they’re wrong.

In many ways, attracting and retaining HNWIs isn’t much different that getting and keeping what are called “mass affluent” clients, who have with assets of less than $1 million. But the differences are worth noting, because the stakes are higher, and a bit of extra knowledge can pay off.

This story first ran on July 21, 2017. Reprinted with permission.

Related Links from MarketWatch:

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7 Steps to Building a Business Breakthrough

Have you ever been stuck atop a production plateau or seen your business head in a steady decline and wondered what it would take to turn your business around? Most advisers and agents go through peaks, valleys and crossroads at some point in their careers. There are many ways to pivot and change your trajectory if you find yourself in need of a re-route. Here are a few of my suggested steps to help you.

Step 1: Choose to Succeed
It may sound simplistic but success is a choice, either you desire to succeed or you don’t. To take the first step toward positive outcomes you have to want to move in the right direction. So, if you are tired of being where you are you must make a conscious decision to do want it takes to ensure change actually happens or the status quo will continue.

Step 2: Adopt a Great Attitude
It’s been said that, “Life is 10 percent what happens to me and 90 percent how I react to it.” Adopting a great attitude starts by understanding that nobody is responsible for your success but you. How you look at your circumstances is a choice that you must make every day. You will always be faced with obstacles but if you view them as an opportunity to grow you can turn them into triumphs. Start each day with an attitude of gratitude for all that you have and watch how quickly other aspects of your business and your life start to fall into place.

Step 3: Create Systems to get Results
No one ever built a great business by winging it. When you are truly honest with yourself you will realize that creating processes and systems for every aspect of your business, time management, prospecting, sales, client servicing and so on is the best way to get results. The secret to creating systems is to duplicate other’s successes by learning and implementing their systems. So ask someone you look up to in your business, what is working for them? Why re-invent the wheel?

Step 4: Take Massive Action
It has also been said that, “The distance between dreams and reality is action.” And, the more action you take the higher the likelihood that you’ll succeed. Let’s face it, you can have a fantastic system but if you don’t actually implement or integrate it then it is merely a wasted resource. Conversely, taking massive action ultimately generates both motivation and momentum.

Step 5: Track Your Progress
Measuring your milestones is a terrific way to enjoy the journey. In order to know if you are on the right path you must consistently track and evaluate your progress. It can be as simple as adding people to your pipeline daily or as complex as recording dials, contacts, new prospects, appointments and accounts. Knowing where you were and where you are now will help keep you moving toward where you want to be.

Step 6: Reward Yourself
As you accomplish your goals, it’s important to reward yourself along the way. Rewards act as a motivator to continue taking daily action because it provides an added incentive to push a little harder towards your end goal. Some successful advisers and agents use a simple reward system like allowing themselves to get a cup of coffee only after having contacted five new prospects. When you use this type of reward system consistently you form great habits to continue building your business.

Step 7: Make Course Corrections
To reach your peak potential, it’s important to make course corrections from time to time. Take for instance having a proven cold calling prospecting system that a successful colleague used to build his or her business. He or she was kind enough to map out their system for you, you took action, recorded milestones and rewarded yourself but success seems to be happening at a slower pace for you than you had expected. Chances are that you may need to make a slight course correction around who your target market is, tweaking what you say or how you are handling objections to duplicate their success.

Why Building a Business Breakthrough System Works
Business breakthroughs don’t happen overnight. It takes time to implement each step until you find the pace and formula that works for you. Now that you understand a bit more about what is involved to get going, all you need to do next is to take that first step towards your destination.

Are you using some or all these steps to have your own business breakthrough? To learn more, schedule a 30-minute coaching session with me by emailing Melissa Denham, director of client servicing.

Dan Finley

 

Daniel C. Finley
President
Advisor Solutions
St. Paul, Minn.


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5 Steps to ‘Connecting the Room’

One of life’s simple pleasures for me is something that others might dread: public speaking. For more than 20 years I’ve had the honor and privilege to speak in front of a wide range of audiences—investors, financial advisers, insurance agents and wholesalers.

A rookie financial adviser client of mine explained that he had held his first seminar and it had resulted in setting several appointments with qualified prospects. However, he was disappointed overall because he said that the audience barely said a word during his entire presentation. Even when he would ask them a question or attempt to interact with them, the room was silent.

If this has ever happened to you, please know that it happens to most speakers at some point in their careers. To combat that challenge, I’ve developed a solution that I refer to as “connecting the room.” If you apply this technique, I’m pretty sure you will never just hear crickets during your presentation again.

The following is a step-by-step process for connecting the room.

Step 1: Ask Strategic Questions

It’s no secret that the audience tends to be more engaged at listening when you ask them questions. That’s why it’s important to map out your questions prior to your presentation so that you have a strategy ahead of time.

Typically, I tend to start off a new subject with a question. An example of this was years ago when I prepared one set of questions for each section of my presentation. Instead of reading the Power Point slide titled “Inflation Eats up Your Purchasing Power,” I simply asked a strategic question to the group of retirees, which was, “How many people here paid more for their last car then they did their first house?”

Step 2: Get the Audience to Take Action

Another great way to help the audience connect with one another is to collectively ask them to take action by raising their hand. After I asked the earlier question, I paused and said, “Let’s see a show of hands of who can relate to that. Please raise your hand if you can.”

Immediately, several hands went up.

Step 3: Make a Connection

Next, pick out one person who seems to be paying attention or actively listening so that you can ask them to tell their story to the crowd. Ask, “What is your name?” then simply turn the dialogue over to them by saying something like, “Joe, when did you buy your first house? What type of home was it (ex: rambler, townhouse, split-level, etc.)? Was it here in town or somewhere else?” Let this individual share the limelight for a moment then continue asking a few more questions. Examples might be, “What was the biggest purchase item aside from your home that you bought?” and “Do you think you the prices for items like that will continue to rise?” Your final question should be a closed-ended question which elicits a “yes” or a “no” so you can emphasize your point. Finish the interaction by thanking the person, “Joe, thanks for sharing! Who here can relate to Joe’s story? Let’s see a show of hands.”

Step 4: Connect the Room

Usually a group tends to listen more intently when a speaker is dynamic and uses dialogue, versus a speaker who is static and utilizes a monologue. If you sprinkle in interactions throughout your presentation, your audience will be waiting for them. Use as many as you can—as time permits—to solidify your messaging and to strengthen your connection with those in the room.

Step 5: Make Your Point

Before moving on from one topic to another be sure to ask a summarizing question. Here is an example, “Does anyone know why things are more expensive today than they were when you bought your first house?” Let someone offer an answer and then explain your point of view. You could say something like, “The reason things are more expensive is because inflation eats up your purchasing power!”

Transitioning from one topic to another is often the best time to engage with the audience and have the group collectively relate to each other. Be sure your questions are catered to the demographic to which you are speaking and that the questions support your point of view.

Why Connecting the Room Works

When you use this technique, watch what happens to the people in the room, they speak more freely and are more apt to want to speak with you afterwards and hopefully they are on their way to becoming one of your clients. If they feel comfortable then they feel connected!

To schedule a complimentary 30-minute coaching session with me at, email Melissa Denham, director of client servicing at Advisor Solutions.

Dan Finley

 

Daniel C. Finley
President
Advisor Solutions
St. Paul, Minn.

 

 


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Building Growth Through Succession Planning

Succession planning isn’t just an “end-game strategy”; it is the key to growth and sustainability.

The specific goals of the succession planning process depend on the founder and his or her circumstance—including age, health and family demands—and they vary case by case. The point, though, is to take a methodical and practical approach to building a business that will endure beyond the builder. Four key areas to concentrate on are:

  1. Building strong, sustainable growth;
  2. Creating a focus on the bottom-line;
  3. Implementing a practical and reliable continuity plan; and
  4. Designing an income perpetuation strategy for the founding owner

The first is perhaps the most important. Building strong, sustainable growth for the business is supported by a clear succession plan in two ways. First, by incorporating next generation advisers who will be investing financially and physically as they buy in. One of the most effective ways to grow a business is to help the next generation build on the foundation the founder has already created and gradually transition ownership—and leadership. The next generation will learn not only how to “think like an owner,” but to be an owner. They will connect the daily goal of revenue production with the long-term goal of producing sustainable revenue in an efficient and scalable manner. They will make decisions that benefit the whole, not just themselves.

Second, growth through succession is about even more than just improving numbers. Strong, sustainable growth demands that the business owner increase their own capabilities as a leader—not just as a producer. As an executive of a multi-generational business, building the strength and depth of the entire team fuels continuous growth.

Cultivating ongoing growth in this way allows a founder to realize exponential value in the business they’ve built, while allowing them to plan for life after advising without worrying about the future of the business or the clients.

Unless the world of professional financial advisers discovers immortality or the fountain of youth, 100 percent of today’s advisers will see their careers come to an end, one way or the other. The only question is how you’ll help your clients transition from your advice and care to someone else’s. Will it be through a professional and carefully crafted succession plan; a last-minute sale to a friend or colleague; or will the clients be left to fend for themselves?

Building a business is about building for the future—your future and your clients’ futures. With a solid succession plan you not only promote growth—you build a legacy, and most importantly, you provide for your clients’ needs beyond the length of your individual career.

david_grau_sr

 

David Grau Sr., J.D.
President and Founder
FP Transitions
Lake Oswego, Ore.


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Pushing Past the Upper Limit Problem

Have you ever wondered why you are not consistently having record-setting years? Oftentimes while coaching financial advisers and insurance agents, I have noticed specific behavioral patterns that kick in soon after individuals have experienced success.

the-big-leapGay Hendricks, the author of the book The Big Leap: Conquer Your Hidden Fear and Take Life to the Next Level has coined a term for this that he refers to as “the upper limit problem”—which he defines as the amount of success that you are willing to allow yourself to have.

Here is how it works: We all have an “inner thermostat” that is set on just how much success we are willing to allow ourselves to have before we do something to self-sabotage and get back to our comfort zone. Unfortunately, most people don’t know their thermostat’s setting, much less a process for inching to a higher setting.

How to Reset Your Inner Thermostat and Resolve Your Upper Limit Problem
Hendricks said that in order to get to the next level, you cannot solve the problem that is holding you back; rather you need to resolve the problem by gaining a new level of awareness about it. Let’s take a look at the four main zones that he refers to that explains where people get stuck.

The Zone of Incompetence. One of the most common zones that I’ve seen advisers and agents revert to when they start to experience success is The Zone of Incompetence, which refers to spending time doing activities we are clearly not good at. Take for instance the last time you were having a record month: as the days went on did you find yourself doing activities that your assistant could be doing? If so, it was most likely because you were self-sabotaging your time by not doing activities that could have contributed to your continued level of success.

The Zone of Competence. Let’s say that you are great at doing what should be your assistant’s activities, you’ve done them for years and you find yourself saying things like, “Well, she’s got plenty to do so it’s just easier if I do this one thing for my client instead.” The challenge with this is that it’s never just one thing. If you are finding yourself doing these tasks, you are in The Zone of Competence. You both could be doing these activities but the truth is that if you are already having a successful month you essentially are now giving yourself permission to stop doing your job and tackling items that your assistant really should be completing.

The Zone of Excellence. Successful advisers and agents find themselves in The Zone of Excellence when they are accomplishing activities that they do well and are getting compensated. Unfortunately, this can create a comfort zone which in the long term will hold one back from reaching their peak potential. In addition, you may find yourself falling into a rut doing what you do well but not liking what you are doing. In other words, if you are great at public speaking but are sick of doing seminars you may not be happy and thus need to find things you are good at and like doing. You will burnout otherwise.

The Zone of Genius. At some point, you need to ask yourself the tough question, If you couldn’t fail at your business, what is it that you really would love to be doing differently?” The answer to that question will lead you to The Zone of Genius, in which you are doing what you love to do. As a result, work won’t feel like work. In this zone time doesn’t fly but instead it flows; you are not exhausted, you feel fulfilled. Granted you will still have to work to make a great living but you would also be happy and passionate about your professional life.

Taking the Big Leap
Take a moment to determine what zone you are currently in. If you want to live your life’s purpose, then you must take a big leap of faith and commit to becoming the person you are meant to be by finding the work you love to do. Then express to your target market your unique abilities and genuine willingness to help them so that one day they too could be in a position to afford to do what they love to do. If you can take this leap, you will have done what Hendricks meant by conquering your hidden (or unknown) fear and taking yourself to the next level of work and life.

If you are ready to take your big leap, schedule a complimentary 30-minute coaching session with me by emailing Melissa Denham, director of client servicing at Advisor Solutions.

Dan FinleyDaniel C. Finley
President
Advisor Solutions
St. Paul, Minn.