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5 Steps to Run Your Business with Positive Intention

Years ago, when I was a rookie, I was running out to an appointment with a client I was hoping to close, when a colleague wished me good luck. My immediate response was, “Thanks, but he’ll probably have to think about it.” My peer replied, “You’re right—if you go into the meeting with that intention.”

On the ride to the appointment I thought about what my co-worker had said and realized that I needed to run my business by going into each phone call and every appointment with a vision of a successful outcome rather than with my existing, less enthusiastic mindset. I quickly changed my focus—which had been negative—and instead worked on how to handle any possible objections that might arise during the appointment.

The result was one of the smoothest presentations (and closes) I’d ever experienced. Afterward, I made the connection: the reason my meeting went so well wasn’t because my change in focus was attracting success but because I went into the appointment expecting success.

The following are the steps I’ve used in many situations, in business and life, to increase my probability of success. Apply these steps and watch how your business and life can transform for the better.

Step 1: Believe in the outcome you want. When I look back at the aforementioned story, I realize now (20 years later) that although I knew I wanted to close that prospect, I didn’t believe that I would. Knowing what outcome you want and believing in your ability to achieve that outcome can be two entirely different thought processes. That’s why it’s so important to address any doubts you have by asking yourself, “What is the evidence that this is true?” And, in my case the follow-up question was simply, “Have I ever closed a prospect before? If I’ve done it once I can do it a thousand times more.” By questioning a negative belief system you are in fact decreasing its validity and increasing your own belief in yourself.

 Step 2: Know where you are now. On the ride to that particular appointment I had a revelation that I needed to run my business with intention. Up to that point I’d actually run my business by winging it. Believe me, I’ve coached hundreds of financial advisers and insurance agents since 2004 and one thing I learned early on is that winging it doesn’t work. That is why you need to get crystal clear on where you are now and where you desire to be. In other words, what have you been doing that has been preventing you from reaching your full potential?

For me, it was taking the time to prepare recommendations while neglecting to prepare for the presentation and any objections.

Step 3: Decide what to do and do it. That appointment was a turning point in my career because I realized that people don’t want to be corrected, they want to be connected. In other words, people don’t like to be told they have been doing something wrong with their investment strategy but they do what to know that you care about them and that you have their best interest at heart. In order to show them that, you need to ask questions to help prospects see that they have a challenge (if they do) and to realize that you have the solution.

So, I decided that I would focus on having a process for my presentations, ask better questions and lead them down a path to understand what value I could offer them.

Step 4: Prepare for possible pushbacks. In business, as well as life, we’re all faced with the possibility of pushbacks, those unforeseen obstacles that prevent us from reaching our desired results. In the case of presenting the prospect with recommendations, it’s highly likely that they will have objections. That’s why I decided to study a process (and actually develop a system) to handle any type of objection. When you prepare for possible pushback, you increase your likelihood of success because you are ready for the inevitable obstacles.

Step 5: Evaluate the process. A simple barometer for understanding how well your process is working is to observe the results you’re seeing (or not seeing). If you’re obtaining your desired results, than keep doing what you are doing, but if not it’s time to go back to the beginning and start over at step one.

Why Positive Intentions Work

The more often you go into any situation with an intentional, positive attitude and a plan, the more likely that it will become a habit. If you begin each interaction knowing what you want to happen, believe in the outcome and prepare your dialogue for inevitable objections and you will no doubt increase your probability for success. The reason why running your business with positive intentions works is because it’s the antithesis of “winging it” or leaving your business up to chance. Instead, expect success by preparing to succeed.

Schedule a complimentary 30-minute coaching session with me by emailing Melissa Denham, director of client servicing.

Dan Finley
Daniel C. Finley is the president and co-founder of Advisor Solutions, a business consulting and coaching service dedicated to helping advisers build a better business.


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5 Ways to Connect at a Conference

With the Financial Planning Association’s Annual Conference coming up in a few days at Music City Center in Nashville, it might be helpful to brush up on some tips for successful communication.

Chances are this isn’t your first rodeo, but for the first-timers, students, interns and the socially anxious among us, tips we recently gleaned from reading How to Talk to Anyone: 92 Little Tricks for Big Success in Relationships by Leil Lowndes, could come in handy, both during one-on-one meetings at the upcoming conference and with your clients.

While we won’t recap all 92 tricks, we can boil it down to the top five recurring themes in Lowndes’ book. These might seem like no-brainers, but it doesn’t hurt to have a refresher.

1.) Use smiles, eye contact to convey genuine interest: Lowndes introduces what she calls the “flooding smile technique”—don’t automatically smile the same bright smile for everybody. In fact, don’t smile automatically at first when you meet somebody, wait a split second and then have a “flooding smile” that makes the person you are talking to feel you are the smile is unique for them.

2.) Use good posture and fidgeting to convey confidence: Maintain eye contact with the person who is speaking until they are finished. Lowndes calls this “sticky eyes.” When you must look away, try to do it slowly. This will convey your genuine interest.

Standing up tall will make you seem confident and limiting fidgeting (messing with your hair, touching your face, etc.) makes you seem more trustworthy.

3.) Match the mood, actions and tone of voice of the person you’re talking to. If you want to connect with somebody, it is helpful to match them on several levels. If they are rushing to a session, don’t stop them and launch into a long story. If you have impeccable manners and always hold your tea cup with one pinky out while your opposite hand holds the saucer, but the speaker doesn’t, match the way they do things to make them feel comfortable. Echoing their tone of voice is another way to make them feel more comfortable.

4.) Be specific. You are guaranteed to get two questions when you meet new people—where are you from and what do you do. Lowndes writes that you should never have a “naked” response to these standard questions. For example, she says that when somebody asks you where you are from, you shouldn’t simply say your city, add a unique fact about your city. Be specific about what type of financial planning you do or why your practice is named what it’s named (if there’s an interesting story there).

Also, if you’re thanking somebody, tell them why. For example, if you’re chatting up a presenter, tell them, “Thank you—your session gave me some great takeaways for my practice.”

5.) Be inquisitive, interested and curious. People like to talk about themselves and if you want to make a connection, ask lots of questions and encourage them to keep talking. Learn about them and don’t just “umm” along—build off what they are saying and ask them questions. Also, remember what they say, that way when you are in a group, you can introduce that person to the others and encourage them to tell a story they’ve told to you.

Hopefully some of these tips will help you make great connections at conference. We’re looking forward to seeing you in Nashville!

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Ana Trujillo Limón is associate editor of the Journal of Financial Planning and the editor of the FPA Practice Management Blog. Email her at alimon@onefpa.org. Follow her on Twitter at @AnaT_Edits.

 

 

 

 


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These Tips Can Help Advisers Attract—and Keep—High Net Worth Clients

By Robert Powell, MarketWatch.com

For many advisers, high net worth individuals or households — those with more than $1 million in investible assets — are a kind of Holy Grail.

The reasons are clear. HWNIs, which represent just 0.7 percent of the world’s adult population but own 45.2 percent of the wealth, are good for business. They’re highly profitable and loyal, according to Rebecca Li-Huang, a wealth adviser at HSBC, who wrote a chapter in the June 2017 book Financial Behavior: Players, Services, Products, and Markets.

Consider: An adviser can earn one-half of 1 percent of assets under management on a $10 million account, say $50,000 a year. By contrast, the very same adviser would earn only $1,000 a year on a $100,000 account. For financial advisers, the attraction should be obvious.

But there’s more to the story, and advisers should get to know the psychology of HNWIs before taking them on as clients. Just like regular folks, Li-Huang wrote, they are prone to behavioral biases and judgment errors, not perfectly rational, utility-maximizing, unemotional homo economicus.

In short, wrote Li-Huang, they are humans. And in the U.S., according to Li-Huang, they often share a particular way of thinking about what they want from their money that financial advisers should consider when trying to serve them.

American HNWIs like to direct their investment according to their personal beliefs and values, and they play a large role in public life through philanthropy and politics, according to Li-Huang. And many want to leave a legacy by giving back to society while generating a financial return on their investments.

“The holistic returns on cultural, environmental, social, and political causes are gaining importance in wealth management,” wrote Li-Huang. “The trend toward helping HNWIs address their personal aspirations and social-impact needs is part of a broader wealth management industry transition toward giving holistic wealth advice.”

Focus on goals while mitigating stress

How can advisers do that? For starters, according to Li-Huang, advisers can focus on goals-based financial planning, holistic wealth management, and services that address investments, lending, tax and estate planning, insurance, philanthropy, and succession planning.

With goals-based planning, wrote Li-Huang, success is measured by how clients are progressing toward their personalized goals rather than against a benchmark index such as the S&P 500 stock index. (Publicly traded securities don’t necessarily contribute that much to a HNWI’s wealth, notes Li-Huang, as just one in eight millionaires say equities were an important factor in their economic success.)

Still, she argues, HNWIs do need to invest in diversified markets and use tax-efficient strategies. And advisers can add value by “mitigating psychological costs, such as reducing anxiety rather than improving investment performance” and by focusing on financial planning and advice on savings and asset allocation.

Li-Huang cited research that suggests that investors don’t necessarily want the best risk-adjusted returns but, rather, the best returns they can achieve for the level of stress they have to experience, or what some call anxiety-adjusted returns.

In the cast of HNWIs, they tend to practice something called “emotional inoculation.” They outsource the part of the investment decision-making that induces stress, according to Li-Huang.

HNWIs are especially looking to their wealth manager for help with philanthropy. They are looking for “support and advice, such as setting goals and defining their personal role in their areas of interest, identifying and structuring investments, and measuring outcomes of their social impact efforts,” she wrote.

Given that advisers need to provide their HNWI clients with tax and philanthropy specialists.

In advisers they trust

When HNWIs consider selecting an adviser, they tend to focus more on honesty and trustworthiness than past investment performance or standard professional credentials, according to Li-Huang.

That’s not to say that professional credentials and competence don’t matter — they do — but, rather, that they are not sufficient in and of themselves, according to Li-Huang.

HNWIs — who tend to have less time and resources for due diligence than typical clients of financial advisers — use something called “trust heuristics” when searching for an adviser with whom to work.

In other words, they’re even more likely to assume that the category leaders are among the best in a highly regulated world even as they hold advisers referred by family members, friends and acquaintances in high regard, according to Li-Huang.

Consequently, perhaps, HNWIs tend to trust their advisers much more than less wealthy retail investor trust their financial advisers.

So, what is trust to a HNWI? According to Li-Huang, HNWis trust advisers who show signs that they’re acting in the client’s best interest, reach out proactively, charge reasonable fees, deliver mistake-free work — and admit when they’re wrong.

In many ways, attracting and retaining HNWIs isn’t much different that getting and keeping what are called “mass affluent” clients, who have with assets of less than $1 million. But the differences are worth noting, because the stakes are higher, and a bit of extra knowledge can pay off.

This story first ran on July 21, 2017. Reprinted with permission.

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The Circle of WOW

On a recent flight home, after giving a keynote speech on driving deep client loyalty in the financial services industry, the woman sitting next to me asked about my business. It turns out that she was a public relations executive for the dental industry.

Intrigued, I asked, “What is the most effective slogan you have ever authored in your world of teeth?” She responded, “Simple. This one: you don’t have to floss every tooth, just the ones you want to keep.”

Instructive! So it is for clients in the financial services industry: you do not have to connect emotionally, or make meaning with every client, just the ones you want to keep.

Let’s be candid: nobody can control market events, but investment advisory teams can control how they connect emotionally with clients, colleagues and others. Regulatory changes and challenging investment environments should remind us that making stronger connections is more important than ever. And a key way of doing that is what we at Janus Henderson Labs affectionately refer to as The Art of WOW—focusing on actions that build impactful connections with those we care about at work and beyond.

Launching a meaningful wow journey requires planning. We like to start with “The Circle of WOW,” a four-step business development approach designed to fire up your business development efforts and start a perpetual upward spiral of results:

Step 1: Evaluate. Find your super-niche that helps you grow on purpose, not by accident. No matter what your profession—cultivating a “happiness advantage” is a natural outcome of discovering your unique business tranche (UBT) and developing your business around it.

Step 2: Activate. Identify and WOW your “Client Marketing Officers” and never ask for a referral again. Learn to consistently deliver WOW experiences to key members of your UBT, and leverage their guidance on how to grow your business with the help of other extraordinary members of the group.

Step 3: Replicate. Curate ideal clients and quit prospecting as you know it. With the help of your Client Marketing Officers, identify best new prospective clients and connect with them based on the fundamentals of WOW. Design each prospect’s experience based on a customized assertion schedule.

Step 4: Perpetuate. Create a magnetic ecosystem. Stop promoting and start attracting (and connecting). Deliberately cultivate personal rituals and design your environment to continually attract and nurture your UBT. Maintain a strong presence as an expert and dominate your space with unmistakable joy and command.

While WOWing our clients is certainly an art, we follow an actionable playbook on how unexpected, thoughtful behavior can elevate you from a professional resource to a provider of truly personalized service.

To learn more contact Janus Henderson about The Art of WOW. Our program, designed to drive extreme client loyalty, was developed in partnership with Dr. Joseph Michelli, internationally recognized client experience expert and author of The New Gold Standard: 5 Leadership Principles for Creating a Legendary Customer Experience Courtesy of the Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company and The Starbucks Experience.

JohnEvans
John L. Evans Jr., E.D., is the executive director of Janus Henderson Labs of Janus Henderson Investors, formerly Janus Capital Group. He is a practice management expert who conducts extensive consulting and training with top financial intermediaries and businesss leaders worldwide.

 


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5 Steps to Manage Critical Mass

It never ceases to amaze me when I get a call out of the blue from a former client who is concerned with how their business is doing. Typically, they have had a downturn in their production for various reasons such as lack of prospecting or motivation or even as a result of being complacent. However, today was an interesting turn of events when I receive a call from a previous client, Seth, who was excited to inform me that his business had reached what he termed “critical mass” and he didn’t know what to do about it.

Apparently, his consistent prospecting had paid off and he was now bringing in more assets, new accounts and doing more production than he had ever done before. I congratulated him on all of his accomplishments and that is when the conversation turned to the real reason for his call. He simply said, “I need your help. I have no idea how to manage this level of success.”

I’m sure we can all agree that this type of scenario is a good one to have, but regardless it was now proving to be a challenge. Since we had worked together, he trusted me and knew we would brainstorm a solution.

Following is a brief overview of some of the suggestions I would offer to you if your business grows beyond your expectations.

Step 1: Know What You Like and Don’t Like to Do. Some advisers and agents like to prospect while others like to manage their client base. The first step is to get crystal clear in understanding what you like and don’t like to do. Simply make a list of all the weekly activities you need to accomplish regularly and put a plus or a minus after each. It won’t take long before you realize what activities you look forward to doing and what activities you dread—if you didn’t know already.

Step 2: Do What You Love and Delegate the Rest. In Seth’s case, he loves to prospect and that is a big reason why his business had taken off. He also loves to manage his client base. However, about six months ago his assistant had decided to be a stay-at-home mom so she resigned. To save money, he chose to be his own assistant. Unfortunately, there is no one to delegate things to that he doesn’t like to do, such as the administrative activities and day-to-day operational tasks. The solution for him was to find someone who loves to do these types of activities. So, he needed to hire, train and delegate everything not involving prospecting and managing the client base to somebody else.

Step 3: Create a Scalable Business Model and Stick to It. In order to consistently manage steady growth, it’s important to have a scalable business model. Seth had realized that years ago when he transitioned his clients to fee-based accounts and continued prospecting as well as systematically servicing his clients. Within a few short years, he had doubled his assets and revenue. His fee-based model allows him the time to continue growing and managing his book of clients. And it shows.

Step 4: Create a Team. At some point, it’s important to admit that in order to continue growing and servicing your client base effectively it takes more than one or even two people. Eventually, Seth will have to look at adding some additional people to his team. One example would be to add a paraplanner to help put financial plans together. Since he is a people person and loves to connect, it might be a good fit to have someone who loves to do manage the behind the scenes work. This would free up some of his time to continue prospecting and meeting with his client base.

Step 5: Expand Your Value. Another option is to expand your value by introducing additional services to your client base. An example of this is for Seth to add an insurance agent to the team who would cross-sell to the client base offering quotes on property/casualty, life, health and even long-term care insurance. Doing this would not only help his clients but it would also help him retain his client base.

Why Strategic Growth is Important
Generating critical mass doesn’t happen to everyone. However, if you consistently prospect it can happen to you. The reason why having a strategy to consistently grow your business is important is because it will help you reduce the growing pains that come along with success. When you know what the next step is, then you are not afraid to take it.

Have you mapped out your success? If not, why not? Discuss this with me in a complimentary 30-minute coaching session. Schedule one by emailing Melissa Denham, director of client servicing.

Dan Finley
Daniel C. Finley is the president and co-founder of Advisor Solutions, a business consulting and coaching service dedicated to helping advisers build a better business.


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How to Get the Right Prospect to Your Event

It happens all the time. An adviser plans a high-end client appreciation dinner or wine event and spends weeks planning every aspect. The dinner menu, the flowers, the drinks, the guests to invite, the seating arrangements—everything is carefully thought through.

And since the adviser is a generous host, clients are invited to bring a guest. The adviser is casual about it but hopes clients will bring along a great prospect, perhaps an executive-level peer. And then the big night comes and the clients show up promptly, ready to have fun—with their 14-year-old daughter in tow.

That’s frustrating. Disappointing. And a missed opportunity! As the host of the event, it’s your job to make sure people know what to expect and whom they should bring to your gathering. It’s great that you want to meet new people, and your existing clients are wonderful sources of prospects for you. But rather than leave it up to clients to bring a friend, it’s far more effective if you can suggest an appropriate guest.

Listen for Name Drops

When you meet with clients, of course you listen closely as they talk about the people, places and activities that are important to them. But you should also be sure to ask questions, when appropriate, to learn more about their golf foursome, book club or brother who moved to town. Keep track of the names that come up in these conversations so that you have a ready pool of good candidates for your business and events. It’s easy from there to say something like the following:

“You mentioned recently that your tennis partner is a lot of fun. I’d be delighted to have her and her husband as my guests at the dinner as well.”

Hopefully, you’ll get to meet the prospect who would be a good fit for your firm (which you know because you’ve Googled her, just to make sure.) But even if that doesn’t happen, your clients will understand the type of person you’re looking to meet by the names you’ve brought up.

Look for Leads

In addition to your own research, you can leverage LinkedIn to find out whom your clients know. Simply visit their profile and click on “See Connections.” This list will quickly and easily give you some ideas of people to suggest your clients bring, and you’ll be able to learn some important details about these people—perhaps their involvement on a hospital board or a past job or charity work.

Hint, Hint

If all else fails, and you still want your clients to bring a prospect, try something simple, like this:

“I’d like this wine tasting to be as much fun as possible for you. As you know, we won’t be talking any business—this is purely for pleasure. Is there a friend, or a couple that you know, who also shares your passion for red wine? If you’d like to bring them along, I’m happy to welcome them. And you know you’ll have a great time.”

This should keep the 14-year-old daughter at home and hopefully open up the invite to a promising prospect. With these tips in mind, you’ll have more enjoyable events while growing your business at the same time.

Joni Youngwirth_2014 for web
Joni Youngwirth, managing principal, practice management, at Commonwealth Financial Network®, Member FINRA/SIPC, helps advisers develop the mindset and systems to grow their businesses to the next level.

 

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Kristine McManus, chief business development officer, practice management, at Commonwealth Financial Network®, Member FINRA/SIPC, works with advisers to grow their top line through the introduction of various programs, tools and coaching.


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Does Your Practice Have a High-Performance Team?

A high-performance team is a concept within organizational development which refers to a team, organization or virtual group that is highly focused on its goals to achieve superior business results.

A high-performance team is one in which you have the right people doing the right things the right ways for the right clients at the right times for the right reasons.

Do you have a high-performance team? The following checklist of behaviors and attributes of high-performance teams can help you figure that out:

  • Have a clear vision and are committed to a common purpose.
  • Have clearly defined roles and responsibilities.
  • Are committed to ongoing, honest and effective communication. Included in this is: having tactical daily huddles; weekly and monthly team meetings; and strategic quarterly and annual off-site meetings.
  • Have a compelling and differentiating story that all team members can articulate.
  • Commit to high productivity daily. Included in this is utilizing time-blocking strategies; consistently utilizing a contact management system; engaging in effective workflow among team members; executing a task priority system; being purposeful and intentional in daily work with a high focus on proactivity; systematizing and documenting all repeated activities as standard operating procedures; spending 10 percent of time on the business every week; embracing technological resources to drive efficiency; and being cross-trained and having back-up systems.
  • Consistently demonstrate a positive, can-do and will-do attitude. This includes: going above and beyond job descriptions; being solutions-focused and committed to problem solving; and innovating to drive efficiency and productivity.
  • Have strong personal accountability. This includes believing in self-leadership; having short- and long-term goals; owning mistakes; frequently evaluating individual, team, and business performance; embracing giving and receiving constructive criticism; understanding role and value in the vision and overall success of the group; and ensuring that words and actions are consistently aligned.
  • Are committed to ongoing personal and professional growth. This includes being masters of their craft; engaging in all firm-provided professional development opportunities; investing in themselves; subscribing to valuable online and offline learning publications; and seeking professional credentials.
  • Are committed and respectful to the leader, the team and themselves. This includes embracing autonomy within their role and embracing collaboration within the team; respecting the ultimate decisions made; and seeking ways to help each other and the team succeed.
  • Celebrate successes. This includes making time to “smell the roses” and have fun together and recognizing each person’s contributions to the team.
  • Master the fundamentals. This includes setting the highest standards for their work; displaying integrity in all things; always putting the clients’ best interests first and foremost; and maintaining mutual respect and trust.

As you consider your staff and team members, identify opportunities for improvements to drive high performance.

Sarah E. Dale, President of Know No Bounds, LLC

 

Sarah E. Dale
Partner
Performance Insights
Atlanta, Ga.

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Krista S. Sheets
President
Performance Insights
Atlanta, Ga.