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5 Tips to Help You Take Charge of Your Social Media Strategy

If your biggest challenge as a financial planner is finding and acquiring new clients, you’re not alone. Nearly two-thirds of financial planners recently surveyed by the Financial Planning Association listed “client acquisition” as their top challenge.

And yet, the money and skillset required to come up with an effective prospecting—and what it might take to execute the plan—can make attracting new clients seem impossible.

While certainly not a magic bullet on its own, social media can be a cost-effective way to build your personal and professional brand and connect with potential clients in a genuine, authentic manner.

This post offers five tips to help clear up common misconceptions about using social media in business and to help you begin building a social-driven prospecting strategy from the ground up.

1.) Recognize the Uses of Each Platform. One mistake when using social media is to immediately build a profile on every platform without thinking through how to create or curate content for each separate entity.

Placing the exact same content on multiple platforms can make your brand look lazy and out of touch. What works on Instagram may be the opposite of what drives engagement on LinkedIn. Further, creating and curating the amount of content required to run a functional blog/website and generate activity on four to five separate social platforms is simply not an option for most small businesses.

Avoid the temptation to build a profile on any social outlet until you have worked out why and how you plan to use the platform. Here are a few tips on some of the heaviest hitters:

LinkedIn is primarily a professional network, and the content that performs best on the platform follows suit. Investopedia reports in its article “LinkedIn: How Advisors Can Use It to Grow” that nearly three-quarters of U.S. advisers maintain a profile, so it may be a good place to look at focusing your initial efforts.

Facebook and Instagram are more personal, with Instagram focusing heavily on imagery. This is not to say that you can’t or shouldn’t have a profile on these platforms, as many advisers do—it all depends on the type of clients you’re trying to reach, the content you are looking to create and/or share and whether you can support many platforms at once.

Twitter is essentially a newsfeed and, while the content required for each post is smaller in volume (140-character limit), the platform requires a larger volume of posts to maintain a semblance of activity.

2.) Find Your Formula. Businesses that use the social platforms for promotion often treat the content as a one-way street to aggressively push product and sales-related information. In his blog post “Why Content is Fire and Social Media is Gasoline,” marketing guru Jay Baer said, “Social media was not intended to be the world’s shortest press release.” I believe social media was designed to replicate human conversation, and building a healthy following is dependent on how well you tell your personal and professional story.

While advisers are somewhat limited in how much they can engage in two-way discussions on social media, one area that can make a major difference is in how you curate and deliver content. If your profile summary, original posts and retweets on Twitter reflect the tone of a sales brochure, you risk driving people away.

Instead, as you’re crafting your profile, writing your first few posts and deciding what to retweet or share, think about how you prefer to get to know someone when you meet in a face-to-face conversation. What do you want people to know about you? What are the things that are most important to you? What defines you? Answering these questions will help you frame your presence in a way that best reflects who you really are.

My good friend (and social media expert) Steffen Kaplan (@SpinItSocial) shared a formula for building an online presence that I have found to be unbelievably valuable, especially when it comes to attracting followers on Twitter. He recommends parsing the content you create, what you share and what you like into three separate buckets: one-third of your posts should be designed to create awareness about your business (think of this as your “branded” content), another third should be personal (answering the questions outlined above) and the last third should be content designed to engage and inspire (quotes, photos and videos that might make others smile).

3.) Share Content That Tells Your Story. Most advisers know they need to do a better job promoting their practice and value proposition, but many don’t consider themselves to be marketers or know where to start in communicating with prospective clients. In the past, promotion didn’t matter as much, as a high percentage of new clients came via referrals from happy customers.

In today’s world, communications should be more persuasive and educational than a simple list of your services. But who has time to create all that content and send it to the right people at the right time? The beauty of the level of saturation in the blogging and social media world is that you don’t need to spend all your time creating your own materials—you can easily find educational content that you appreciate and share it with your clients.

When you share content, you are advocating for the message of the material, and that’s often the closest thing to putting your name on it. Beyond saving time and money, shared content comes with its own set of advantages as it allows you to send powerful messages from a credible third party. Relevant, useful and valuable content is an effective way to build trust with current and prospective clients. As content marketing expert Drew Davis puts it, “Content builds relationships. Relationships are built on trust. Trust drives revenue.”

4.) Don’t Overdo It. You don’t have to post content 50 times a day to be successful. Sure, social media requires creating and posting content with a high level of frequency, but that doesn’t mean you must spend your entire day brainstorming your next tweet.

Like any other marketing medium, social media success depends on the quality of the content you distribute—including the actual post, the attached image or GIF and the post’s linked content. To help focus on quality over quantity (and maintain your sanity), create a simple editorial calendar and plan out posts for each week or month. You can find countless free content calendar templates with a quick online search, but a traditional printed cat or firefighter calendar will also work just fine.

5.) Have Fun! Seriously, have some fun with it and do your best to be you. Your readers and followers will appreciate it, and it will make your content better in the long run.

Happy Tweeting!

Disclaimer: Before you go down this path, it’s important to understand FINRA’s regulations surrounding the use of social media, as well as any guidelines provided by your broker-dealer or RIA, if applicable.

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Dan Martin is the director of marketing for the Financial Planning Association®, the principal professional organization for CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER (CFP®) professionals, educators, financial services professionals and students who seek advancement in a growing, dynamic profession. He is an award-winning author with a diverse financial services industry background in marketing and communications. He earned a journalism degree from the University of Denver and his MBA in marketing from the Daniels College of Business.


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Use the ‘Mere Exposure Effect’ to Attract More Clients

We tend to like people we’re most familiar with.

According to this Social Psych Online article, the phenomenon of liking something or someone after we become more familiar with them is called the mere exposure effect.

Basically, the more you see or hear something, the you more you like it. A 1992 study published in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology demonstrated just how far mere exposure can go. Scientific American noted also that people tend to like people they share things in common with.

Researchers had four different women with similar appearances attend a college class numerous times throughout the semester. One woman didn’t go to any classes, another attended five times, another attended 10 times and the last one attended 15 times. The women simply sat in on the lecture, not interacting with any students.

At the end of the semester, students were asked to evaluate the women on several scales, one of which was physical attractiveness. They rated the woman who’d been to the class 15 times more positively than the other three, Social Psych Online reported.

How Can Advisers use Mere Exposure to Their Advantage?

So just by being around others more often, you have a greater chance that they will view you more favorably. This underlies many of the tenets of networking; the more you put yourself out there, the more others will view you more favorably over time.

But, you don’t have to physically be present for mere exposure to work. Advertisers like McDonalds discovered this long ago, and have been using it to their advantage for decades, as noted in this Science Blogs post.

By sharing information about yourself online, being active on social media and participating in online discussions, others will come to feel as if they know you and will be more likely to feel that they like you.

Twenty over Ten notes that you can nurture this even more if you go one step further and share a bit of personal information about yourself. Write blog posts or articles that include personal anecdotes and stories, which open the door to building rapport and allowing prospective clients to find things about you that they might share in common.

10 Blog Post Ideas to Write and Share to Speed Up the Mere Exposure Process

Every blog post you write is a chance for readers to learn more about you. We know that consumers make choices based not just on services, but based on who they ultimately think they’d enjoy working with.

1.) “Meet the Team”

A “meet the team” post is essentially a blog post that revolves around a Q&A session with you or one of your colleagues. Sharing a glimpse into that team member’s life allows your readers to get a better understanding of the individual and who they are as a person. For example, some questions the team could answer are:

  • What gets you up and going every morning?
  • Where is your favorite place you’ve ever been on vacation, and why?
  • What books are on your nightstand?
  • What inspired you to become a financial adviser?

2.) “5 of My All-Time Favorite Books”

Any favorite books? Articles? TV Show Commentaries? The information we are drawn to and consume says a lot about us. Listing these out in a blog post allows readers to get a sense of who you are, and gives you a great talking point. Sharing this post on social media and asking others to share their top five favorite books also fosters discussion—and you may even reach a new audience of prospective clients.

3.) “Financial News I Read Every Day (That Is Worth Your Time Too)”

Similar to example No. 2, you can share the financial news you read to keep up with daily events. Although it is more geared toward finance, this is still a great way of connecting with your audience because it shares a glimpse into your interests and fosters a sense of care. You are staying up-to-date and educated on behalf of your clients—and this blog post would show that.

4.) “A Peek at Our Own Family Budget”

In this type of post, you can share a glimpse into how you and your family budget and save, and the trade-offs you make personally. For instance, you may want to specifically gear toward a scenario like: “Simple Do’s and Don’ts to Saving for a House” if you are building a client base of millennials. You can discuss the uphills, the downhills, the peaks and the trials to budgeting. We are all instinctively drawn to seeing how others live and these types of post naturally pique our interest.

5.) “Conversation with a Current Client”

For this type of blog post, talk to the client in advance to get permission and ensure them they will remain anonymous. Essentially, this blog post should let prospective clients know the type of situations you and your firm deal with when it comes to handling clients and their financial situation. For instance, you might have a series of “Conversations with a Client”—one client in their 30s, one in their 40s, etc.—that revolve around the biggest questions clients have in those age groups. Or your approach could be “Conversation with a Client Business Owner,” etc.

6.) “My Family Vacation”

Have you taken a recent vacation? Talk about how you handled the budget for vacationing, along with friendly travel tips. For instance, you may have some great recommendations for the resort you stayed at, or the beaches you visited. As we all look forward to our vacations and usually spend a good deal of time investigating which locations/resorts/experiences will be the best value and most interesting, your readers will appreciate your own tips.

7.) “Budgeting for Big Life Events”

With weddings, holidays and many of life’s big events, money is always an important factor. In this blog post, you might share how to effectively save and budget for such events. Because the post will be in real-time (especially with holidays) your chances of getting more reads are definitely higher. For example, a post titled “Budget Friendly Tips for Holiday Spending” around November is sure to get many reads!

8.) “The Top 5 Tools I Use to Run My Business (That are Worth Every Penny)”

In this post, you might share the tools you use to run your business. Are there any tech tools that you couldn’t live without on a daily basis? Perhaps there is a scheduler app to schedule appointments? Or you might use Google Drive to share documents? By sharing your top tools, your readers can get a glimpse into your daily practice and immediately feel more connected with tools they may even potentially use themselves.

9.) “How I Save Money Every Day in the Simplest Ways”

Do you cut back on your daily Starbucks coffee and make your own at home? Do you pack your lunch instead of ordering out? Share a glimpse into your daily spending habits, and how your small trade-offs result in large savings. This type of post provides inspiration to your reader, where he or she may even begin to pick up your own smart saving habits. And since you often ask your own clients to track and take note of their own spending, this is a great “practice what you preach” post.

10.) “How I De-stress from the Financial Markets”

Being in the financial industry is isn’t always easy. With fluctuating markets and worrisome clients, it can even be extremely stressful. What daily rituals do you practice to stay at peace? How do you de-stress? Similarly to No. 9, this type of post can also provide plenty of inspiration to your readers, who may also have high-stress jobs.

Sam_Russell_Headshot
Samantha Russell is the director of sales and marketing at Twenty Over Ten, a web development company that creates tailored, mobile-responsive websites for financial advisers. She’s spent the last five years empowering advisers to market themselves effectively online using digital tools. With a background in marketing, social media and public relations, Russell focuses on helping business owners understand the value of their online presence and connecting them with the marketing tools and digital solutions they need to effectively manage their brand and engage clients.


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7 Deadly Sins of Website Design

Thinking of revamping your website? Creating a new website can be tricky and overwhelming. From choosing the design to perfecting the content, the difficulties financial advisers face when trying to create a new site can seem endless—but there is hope. As you embark on your website design journey be sure to avoid these seven cardinal sins.

1.) Lack of content. While a simplistic site can be advantageous, too little content on your website can be detrimental. If working with a copywriter, you should come prepared and be able to articulate who you are, the services you provide, what those services cost and why you are passionate about your work. These are basic content areas that prospective clients visiting your site will be looking for and if not easily found, may cause them to leave your site look elsewhere.

2.) Impersonal. When a consumer chooses a financial adviser, they decide who to work with based ultimately on how they feel about the person providing the service. It is for this reason that the “About” or “Bio” page of an adviser’s website is almost always the second most-visited page after the homepage. You don’t need to overshare. Getting too personal right away might scare away prospective clients. However, in an industry that relies so heavily on trust, it is especially important to be personable. Simply including a photo of yourself and basic personal information can go a long way in making people more likely to trust you with their finances.

Prospective clients want to know who you are, why you do what you do, what your philosophy/approach is, and hear your story. If you can take it one step further and include a quick video introduction of yourself, even better. At the very least, include two great photos—one headshot and one more informal picture—such as you with your family or enjoying a hobby.

3.) Unidentifiable CTAs. Why do you want a website for your business? What’s the point? Whatever your answer may be—whether it’s to have people contact you, sign up for your newsletter or blog, take a risk assessment, etc., the point is for prospects and referrals to vet you and then take some sort of action step. If your call-to-action (CTA) is too difficult to find (or worse—you don’t have one at all), visitors likely won’t take any action at all. For this reason, it’s critical to make it immediately clear what the next step that you want them to take is.

4.) Ineffective CTAs. On the flip side, it’s just as harmful to have too many CTAs. Too many CTAs compete for users attention and can be overwhelming. If you hit your site visitors with too many CTAs at once, they can end up leaving without taking any of your desired next steps. Imagine visiting a site that immediately has a pop-up inviting you to “Get My Weekly Finance Tips Directly to Your Inbox.” Under the pop-up is a button encouraging you to “Download 5 Tips to Retire By 60” and this is located right next to another button that says, “Schedule Your Free Initial Portfolio Review.” All of these CTAs are too much all at once, cluttering a site and making it feel spammy. Having multiple CTAs is fine, but they should be placed throughout your website more naturally, on different subpages and allowing visitors to “find” them as they peruse your content.

5.) Too Much Static Content. Some static content is a good thing—it ensures that your marketing team doesn’t have to be churning out new material 24/7 and it can be comfortably consistent for visitors. However, relying solely on calculators, stock trackers and pre-written articles or content won’t cut it. If static content is the majority of the content on your website, chances are that is feels outdated and impersonal to visitors. Instead, try to find a nice split (rule of thumb is at least 50/50) between static and dynamic content. Try writing content that focuses on the services that you provide and describes how you’re different.

6.) Contact Forms. One of the biggest and most common mistakes in web design are sites that make it too difficult for prospective clients to figure out how to reach you. This includes having super long contact forms that no one wants to take the time to fill out, not having your contact information (phone number or email address) easy to find, and having incorrect or outdated contact information or no contact information at all. Stick to the basics – if you’re using a contact form, only ask visitors for the bare essentials (name, phone number, email, reason for inquiry). Additionally, it’s a good idea to include a distinct “Contact Us” page on your site to ensure visitors see it and make sure your contact information is up to date. Just remember, a web contact form is not a lead gen strategy!

7.) Not Setting Deadlines. Developing a schedule for yourself is the best way to prevent succumbing to this seventh deadly sin. Map out when that first website content draft is due, write down the date you need to send your designer feedback on layout and images and communicate to your website designer your desired site launch date. Not including deadlines for yourself—or not abiding by the deadlines you’ve set—promotes procrastination and makes it difficult to pick back up where you were in the process. Developing a strong, realistic timeline for yourself helps ensure that your website design process goes as smoothly as possible.

 

Sam_Russell_HeadshotSamantha Russell is the director of sales and marketing at Twenty Over Ten, a web development company that creates tailored, mobile-responsive websites for financial advisers. She’s spent the last five years empowering advisers to market themselves effectively online using digital tools. With a background in marketing, social media and public relations, Russell focuses on helping business owners understand the value of their online presence and connecting them with the marketing tools and digital solutions they need to effectively manage their brand and engage clients.

 


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Overcome 4 Business Challenges with Tech and Training

Advisers are being sold technology to solve their problems at every corner, said Greg Friedman, founder, CEO and president of Private Ocean.

“Technology is so oversold to all of us,” Friedman said at a recent FPA Retreat 2017 session.

It’s a combination of technology and staff training that is the key to managing business challenges, Friedman said. He knows this because during his time in the industry, he’s seen some things.

“I am the poster child for every problem this industry has,” Friedman said, who started Friedman and Associates in 1991 at age 28 with two associates—his twin toddlers—and now the company has “evolved through all stages.” Private Ocean—the result of a merger between Friedman and Associates and Salient Wealth Management—now has 24 full-time employees and seven advisers.

Friedman gave attendees tips on how to solve the four common business challenges—business development, marketing, time management and efficiency.

Utilize available technology. Prospecting becomes easier if you have software that can show you how you are possibly connected to prospects. Friedman uses Relationship Science, which allows planners to plug in a name and see all the connections that adviser potentially has with that prospect.

Marketing automation is another helpful piece of technology. When prospects enter their email on your site, the automation will automatically send the prospect something and then notify you when you have a bite, Friedman said.

Don’t forget CRM.

“CRM is core,” Friedman emphasized. “I don’t care which ones you use, but use one.”

Develop and reward employees. Friedman said having the staff on board is a must for success.

“Having that data and having those systems means nothing if people don’t know how to use it or know how to get clients,” he said, also suggesting that firms provide ongoing sales training and coaching. If advisers are uncomfortable with “sales” training, call it “relationship,” “communication,” or “consulting” training.

Designing a compensation structure that rewards top advisers while not penalizing advisers who don’t meet goals is a way to motivate advisers, Friedman said.

Implement service models effectively. It’s unsustainable to give an eclectic mix of clients the full range of your services, so pick the clients who may not be a match for you and figure out a way to gently steer them to a more appropriate firm or planner.

Also, define what your services are and make more efficient assignments, giving the simple client cases to junior associate advisers and free up time of your more experienced advisers to take on the more profitable, complex clients.

Outsource when needed. Private Ocean outsources some of its marketing efforts to a company called Set Wave, which helps it use social media in the most effective ways.


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5 Reasons Financial Advisers Can’t Afford NOT to Blog in 2017

Your relationships with clients and prospects need to be strong to weather 2017’s potential storms—the DOL fiduciary rule, a new president looking to draw back government regulation, Brexit kicking in by April, increasingly unstable international markets, and more.

Building that relationship is a matter of regular communication. While your existing clientele may communicate with you via phone, visits and email, the majority of the population is now acquainting itself with new advisers online—specifically via blogs. Yet many advisers still aren’t blogging regularly.

Here are five reasons advisers can’t afford NOT to blog in 2017.

1.) It’s the fastest, easiest way to dispel client fears in a year packed with unknowns. The markets are off to a better start than they were last year, but who knows what tomorrow holds?

Most advisers could set their watches around the calls they get from their more anxious clients when things get bumpy.

Answering client questions is a great way to connect, but answering the same questions over and over can be a major time-eater. Save yourself some time by blogging regularly and sending out links to old blogs that address their concerns when market news goes south.

2.) Last year, Google acknowledged that content is king when it comes to search rankings. While Google’s search ranking factors are largely a mystery, just last year they said that new content is one of their top measurements.

The easiest way to regularly add new content to your site? You guessed it: blogging.

Bonus tip: Google also said outbound and inbound links are high on their list.

Outbound links point to other sites from your own site. The best and easiest place to include outbound links? Your blog. Shoot for one to three in every piece.

Inbound links point to your site from other sites. These are more difficult because they require someone else linking to you. But no one wants to link to your “About Us” or “Services” page. Most links between sites point to one place: blogs.

3.) It’s a good way to build trust with prospects (although, admittedly, not the best). If everything goes through with the DOL’s upcoming fiduciary rule change, a lot of advisers will no longer be able to use their fiduciary status as a differentiator. How will you prove you can be trusted?

The best way to establish trust? Actually, it’s face to face interactions—not blogs—but your blog isn’t too far down the list. You don’t have to look far for people who have established themselves as trustworthy authorities, thanks largely to regular blogging (and a fresh perspective): Michael Kitces, Carl Richards, and Wade Pfau, among others.

4.) It’s the best digital driver of new leads. Blog posts are great because they’re a permanent fixture on your site. If you write a post on tax loss harvesting and then a year later someone is searching for that subject, they could happen upon your site.

But old blog posts have nothing on new ones. In my experience, a blog post will typically earn 98 percent of its traffic within the first five days.

The best way to keep new leads rolling in is with new blogs.

5.) Stake your claim with your personas. In the financial industry, not everyone is blogging, but 2016 saw the number increase exponentially. That means countless advisers are out there blogging directly to their desired audience, which quite possibly overlaps with your audience. If you’re not blogging about stuff your personas care about, you’re probably not on their radar.

You might have all the knowledge in the world, but if you haven’t written it down somewhere online, it might as well not exist.

So make 2017 the year you start blogging, and stop missing out on prospects. If you’re still not sure how to get your blog machine up and running, check out this offering from Mineral and Wendy J. Cook Communications, one of our favorite content providers for advisers.

zach-mcdonald

Zach McDonald
Editorial Director
Mineral Interactive
Omaha, Neb.


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Top Blog Posts of 2016

Last year, 2016, was a record-breaking year in the number of visitors and views for the Financial Planning Association’s Practice Management Blog powered by the Journal of Financial Planning.

Here are the top 10 most-viewed blog posts of 2016:

No. 10: “Becoming an Authority: Establishing Your Financial Planning Career.” Emily Fisher, marketing copywriter for Advantage Media, gave planners tips on how to put themselves out there and attract new clients.

No 9: “Top Ten Tips to Implement CRM.” Jennifer Goldman, founder of My Virtual COO, gave planners insight into the best practices in order to maximize their CRM.

No. 8: “Fiduciary Rule for the Modern World.” This post covered the key elements from the press conference that announced the Department of Labor’s Final Rule (fiduciary rule and discussed FPA’s resources for its members.

No. 7: “7 Do’s and Don’ts of Collaborating with Estate Planning Attorneys.” Attorney Gary Altman gave planners insight on what you should look for when it comes to partnering with estate planning attorneys. This post was derived from an answer to a member question on FPA Connect.

No. 6: “9 Things Clients Need to Know about an Adviser.” Regular blog and Journal contributor Kirk Loury gave readers an overview of the things you should be communicating to your clients about yourselves.

No 5: “Advising Clients During Turbulent Times.” Professors Kent Baker (0f American University) and Victor Ricciardi (of Goucher College) gave insight into how to best handle clients who may be distressed during market downturns.

No. 4: “You Cannot Do this Alone.” In this post, Daniel Crosby, behavioral finance expert, published an excerpt of his book, The Laws of WealthThis post discussed the value financial planners bring to clients

No. 3: “8 Components of Social Media Policy.” Claudio Pannunzio, president of i-Impact Group Inc., offered planners the elements that should be included in a successful social media policy, including having a purpose, identifying authorized contributors and having an employee code of conduct.

1216JFP_BestOf2016_Cvr.inddNo. 2: “Framing the Conversation: What to Say in the First 60 Seconds.” Regular blog contributor Daniel Finley, president of Advisor Solutions, gave planners an outline for what to say to potential clients in the first minute.

No. 1: “How to Create Your Ideal Client Profile.” This year’s most-viewed blog post, another by Claudio Pannunzio, discussed how to successfully create an ideal client persona to better attract the clients you want to serve.
If you want to know what we determined as being the best of the Journal of Financial Planning, check out our Best of 2016 issue (picture, right) featuring a “2016 Personal Finance Year in Review,”  by the Journal‘s Academic Editor Barbara O’Neill.

Are you interested in contributing to the FPA Practice Management Blog? Email us with story ideas or content.

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Ana Trujillo
Associate Editor
Journal of Financial Planning
Denver, Colo.


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Are Your Blog Posts Engaging Your Audience?

Our financial adviser clients often pose this question: how do we attract readers to our blog and keep them engaged?

The sad truth is that not everyone who comes across a blog post is going to read it. Consequently, our suggestion is not to worry whether users read the whole article. The key goal is not to attract the masses, rather ensure maximum satisfaction for those who come to read your blog.

The advice we consistently give to our clients is to first and foremost attain an in-depth understanding of the audience they seek to connect with. Creating the right persona is key to running a successful blog and understanding who your readers are and what matters to them—their worries, needs and pains. Consequently, the focus must be on creating content that offers them tips, guidelines and actionable ideas that can be implemented to address their needs. However, the overall aim is to appeal not only to your aficionados but also to those who may never contact you but enjoy reading and sharing your expert advice.

An Emotional Investment

Our recommendation is to focus every blog post on how to reduce and perhaps even help stop your readers’ pains. When your content does that you have got your audience engaged. Ultimately, your audience’s engagement is a direct function of the emotional investment they make in reading your posts. You can foster their commitment by rewarding them with actionable ideas and suggestions they can put to good use over time.

Because the goal of having a blog is also to build a large audience, how then can an adviser attract and engage new readers? The fundamental idea that must be grasped here is that getting readers to read your entire blog post is not your first priority.

Experiencing Tactical Support

Every blog post ought to contain a central, compelling point. What matters is to give readers an experience of having come to a blog that consistently offers them the “tactical support” they need to address their issues. This in turn will compel them to share your insights with their family and friends and, ultimately, become your brand evangelists.

Your blog posts should be written in your own voice. It helps to create your specific style to which readers will grow accustomed and easily recognize—even if they do not read your post in its entirety.

Here are some tips and ideas that may help with your blogging activities:

  • Grab Their Attention: The headline of your blog is the most powerful tool to get your readers’ attention. A significant number of people are attracted by headlines and are more likely to read them rather than your actual post. Seek to write headlines that are clear and easy to understand and avoid technical language
  • Use the Inverted Pyramid Style: This style, also called front-loading, enables you to incorporate into the opening paragraph the vital details addressed in your post. It is a very effective blog writing technique, as web audiences tend to peter out after skimming the first paragraph.
  • Easy Does It: Make it easy for your readers to understand and consume your messages. Use headings to help them decide if they want to read or scroll on to the next paragraph. Write in a crisp clear language and avoid dense paragraphs, as well as industry jargon. Well-formatted posts prevent readers from missing your key insights and ideas.
  • Use Examples: Include in your blog real life examples. Use personal stories and anecdotes to facilitate understanding of complex concepts, ideas and strategies. Make sure to catch your readers’ attention by clearly stating what your product, idea or strategy does and give examples of how it has helped others.
  • A Strong Conclusion: Failing to appropriately conclude your article will offer your readers very little incentive for engagement. The last paragraph of your post should feature a recap of the key takeaways and a call to action to solicit comments and/or inquiries.
  • Be Social—as in Social Media: Make sure your blog features social media buttons that will enable your audience to share the posts they like. Also, make it easy for them to leave comments and/or pose questions by embedding in your blog a commenting capability, such as Disqus or IntenseDebate

Whether or not you are a blogger comments and questions are always welcome.

Claudio PannunzioClaudio O. Pannunzio
President and Founder
i-Impact Group
Greenwich, Conn.

 

Editor’s Note: Other Financial Planning Association content that may be of interest to you include:

A non-FPA resource that is always helpful when it comes to writing tips is Susan B. Weiner’s Investment Writing site