Leave a comment

The Power of Wow

After her particularly stellar basketball season, John Evans, Jr., Ed.D., took his 10-year-old daughter for a trip to the Sarasota, Fla. Ritz Carlton.

On the elevator ride up to their room, he praised her rebounding, her boxing out, her shooting. They settled in, left the hotel, and came back to their room to find a tiny chocolate cake with a message on top reading, “Congratulations on the great season, Susana.”

The bellman had heard the entire conversation and seized the opportunity to give these two guests what Evans refers to as a “wow moment.” He defines this as a unique, emotionally engaging experience that goes beyond expectations and is readily recounted.

Evans, executive director of Janus Henderson Labs of Janus Henderson Investors (formerly Janus Capital Group), told FPA Retreat attendees in April 2017, that generating wow moments for a great client experience, like the one he had at the Ritz Carlton, starts with energy levels, is followed by clarifying your purpose, and ends with expanding your team’s capacity to deliver authentic wow moments (read more about “wow moments” straight from Evans in the June 20 FPA Practice Management Blog post titled, “The Circle of WOW”).

“We have an energy crisis here, ladies and gentleman,” Evans said. “But here is the thing: we can create more energy.”

Evans noted that there are four areas on the energy pyramid: the physical (the fundamental source of fuel, sleep); emotional (the capacity to manage emotions); mental (capacity to organize and focus attention); and spiritual (the purpose beyond self-interest). Of those, we are most stressed in the mental and emotional.

But, Evans noted, stress isn’t always bad.

“Stress is the giver of life,” Evans said. “A life of pillows and marshmallows is no way to live.”

Evans notes that a way to generate more energy in all areas of the pyramid is to embrace stress and abolish multitasking, which he said is “one of the greatest enemies of extraordinary and the pathway to mediocrity.”

It’s counterfeit engagement, he said, and we all need to become more engaged. Focus on one thing at a time, establish healthy habits such as eating right and exercising, and see if your energy levels improve.

Next, advisers must clarify their purpose. Why do you do what you do? What is your purpose? Your cause? Your belief? Actively communicate that from the inside out.

Finally, appoint a “wow czar” or “chief clientologist” whose job it is to help generate these experiences. This person should have tremendous emotional intelligence and be creative.

“We have to be intentional about wow,” Evans said.

anaheadshot
Ana Trujillo Limón is associate editor of the Journal of Financial Planning and the editor of the FPA Practice Management Blog. Email her at alimon@onefpa.org


1 Comment

Use the ‘Mere Exposure Effect’ to Attract More Clients

We tend to like people we’re most familiar with.

According to this Social Psych Online article, the phenomenon of liking something or someone after we become more familiar with them is called the mere exposure effect.

Basically, the more you see or hear something, the you more you like it. A 1992 study published in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology demonstrated just how far mere exposure can go. Scientific American noted also that people tend to like people they share things in common with.

Researchers had four different women with similar appearances attend a college class numerous times throughout the semester. One woman didn’t go to any classes, another attended five times, another attended 10 times and the last one attended 15 times. The women simply sat in on the lecture, not interacting with any students.

At the end of the semester, students were asked to evaluate the women on several scales, one of which was physical attractiveness. They rated the woman who’d been to the class 15 times more positively than the other three, Social Psych Online reported.

How Can Advisers use Mere Exposure to Their Advantage?

So just by being around others more often, you have a greater chance that they will view you more favorably. This underlies many of the tenets of networking; the more you put yourself out there, the more others will view you more favorably over time.

But, you don’t have to physically be present for mere exposure to work. Advertisers like McDonalds discovered this long ago, and have been using it to their advantage for decades, as noted in this Science Blogs post.

By sharing information about yourself online, being active on social media and participating in online discussions, others will come to feel as if they know you and will be more likely to feel that they like you.

Twenty over Ten notes that you can nurture this even more if you go one step further and share a bit of personal information about yourself. Write blog posts or articles that include personal anecdotes and stories, which open the door to building rapport and allowing prospective clients to find things about you that they might share in common.

10 Blog Post Ideas to Write and Share to Speed Up the Mere Exposure Process

Every blog post you write is a chance for readers to learn more about you. We know that consumers make choices based not just on services, but based on who they ultimately think they’d enjoy working with.

1.) “Meet the Team”

A “meet the team” post is essentially a blog post that revolves around a Q&A session with you or one of your colleagues. Sharing a glimpse into that team member’s life allows your readers to get a better understanding of the individual and who they are as a person. For example, some questions the team could answer are:

  • What gets you up and going every morning?
  • Where is your favorite place you’ve ever been on vacation, and why?
  • What books are on your nightstand?
  • What inspired you to become a financial adviser?

2.) “5 of My All-Time Favorite Books”

Any favorite books? Articles? TV Show Commentaries? The information we are drawn to and consume says a lot about us. Listing these out in a blog post allows readers to get a sense of who you are, and gives you a great talking point. Sharing this post on social media and asking others to share their top five favorite books also fosters discussion—and you may even reach a new audience of prospective clients.

3.) “Financial News I Read Every Day (That Is Worth Your Time Too)”

Similar to example No. 2, you can share the financial news you read to keep up with daily events. Although it is more geared toward finance, this is still a great way of connecting with your audience because it shares a glimpse into your interests and fosters a sense of care. You are staying up-to-date and educated on behalf of your clients—and this blog post would show that.

4.) “A Peek at Our Own Family Budget”

In this type of post, you can share a glimpse into how you and your family budget and save, and the trade-offs you make personally. For instance, you may want to specifically gear toward a scenario like: “Simple Do’s and Don’ts to Saving for a House” if you are building a client base of millennials. You can discuss the uphills, the downhills, the peaks and the trials to budgeting. We are all instinctively drawn to seeing how others live and these types of post naturally pique our interest.

5.) “Conversation with a Current Client”

For this type of blog post, talk to the client in advance to get permission and ensure them they will remain anonymous. Essentially, this blog post should let prospective clients know the type of situations you and your firm deal with when it comes to handling clients and their financial situation. For instance, you might have a series of “Conversations with a Client”—one client in their 30s, one in their 40s, etc.—that revolve around the biggest questions clients have in those age groups. Or your approach could be “Conversation with a Client Business Owner,” etc.

6.) “My Family Vacation”

Have you taken a recent vacation? Talk about how you handled the budget for vacationing, along with friendly travel tips. For instance, you may have some great recommendations for the resort you stayed at, or the beaches you visited. As we all look forward to our vacations and usually spend a good deal of time investigating which locations/resorts/experiences will be the best value and most interesting, your readers will appreciate your own tips.

7.) “Budgeting for Big Life Events”

With weddings, holidays and many of life’s big events, money is always an important factor. In this blog post, you might share how to effectively save and budget for such events. Because the post will be in real-time (especially with holidays) your chances of getting more reads are definitely higher. For example, a post titled “Budget Friendly Tips for Holiday Spending” around November is sure to get many reads!

8.) “The Top 5 Tools I Use to Run My Business (That are Worth Every Penny)”

In this post, you might share the tools you use to run your business. Are there any tech tools that you couldn’t live without on a daily basis? Perhaps there is a scheduler app to schedule appointments? Or you might use Google Drive to share documents? By sharing your top tools, your readers can get a glimpse into your daily practice and immediately feel more connected with tools they may even potentially use themselves.

9.) “How I Save Money Every Day in the Simplest Ways”

Do you cut back on your daily Starbucks coffee and make your own at home? Do you pack your lunch instead of ordering out? Share a glimpse into your daily spending habits, and how your small trade-offs result in large savings. This type of post provides inspiration to your reader, where he or she may even begin to pick up your own smart saving habits. And since you often ask your own clients to track and take note of their own spending, this is a great “practice what you preach” post.

10.) “How I De-stress from the Financial Markets”

Being in the financial industry is isn’t always easy. With fluctuating markets and worrisome clients, it can even be extremely stressful. What daily rituals do you practice to stay at peace? How do you de-stress? Similarly to No. 9, this type of post can also provide plenty of inspiration to your readers, who may also have high-stress jobs.

Sam_Russell_Headshot
Samantha Russell is the director of sales and marketing at Twenty Over Ten, a web development company that creates tailored, mobile-responsive websites for financial advisers. She’s spent the last five years empowering advisers to market themselves effectively online using digital tools. With a background in marketing, social media and public relations, Russell focuses on helping business owners understand the value of their online presence and connecting them with the marketing tools and digital solutions they need to effectively manage their brand and engage clients.


Leave a comment

4 Questions to Attract More Clients

There are just four questions that every financial adviser must answer if they want to attract more clients. If you can answer these questions, you’ll be able to more effectively communicate your message to prospects so that they will want to work with you.

No. 1: Who’s Your Ideal Client?

When advisers think about their business and how they help people, they tend to think the most about the services they provide. Things like the types of planning they offer, the investments and products they use for clients, the process they walk clients through, etc., but we rarely focus on defining who we serve.

The financial advisers that will survive and thrive over the long term will define their business not by the service they offer but by the people they serve.

They know exactly who their ideal client is.

No. 2: What Value Do You Provide?

You undoubtedly provide a lot of great advice to your clients. But what do your clients value the most? What’s most important to them?

Do they care about investment selection, the products, the process, your credentials, your years of experience or your past performance? I’m sure they do.

But there’s actually only one thing that your clients value above all else: their transformation.

They are seeking the positive change they experience by working with you. They want the end result. How do I know this? It’s because people buy the destination, not the plane ride.

What is the destination your clients are trying to get to? What’s the ideal end result you can help them achieve? This is the real value you give to clients and prospects.

No. 3: How Do You Clearly Communicate Your Value?

If you’re the greatest financial adviser in the world but you don’t know how to clearly communicate your value to ideal prospects, then you won’t be in business very long. If you cannot clearly communicate your value to people, nothing else you’re doing in your business really matters.

Many good advisers have failed because they didn’t know how to clearly communicate their value.

The best advisers are able to engage in a conversation with a complete stranger and within two minutes, that stranger fully understands how that adviser helps people. Even better, that stranger will have enough curiosity and excitement that they want to hear more from the adviser.

If you’re able to naturally start the conversation with people, you’ll have no trouble getting people in the door. And If you can communicate your value, you’ll have no problem getting people to become your clients.

No. 4: How Will You Consistently Attract and Acquire New Clients?

This is the most important question that advisers need to answer. It’s also the one most advisers have a hard time answering.

How do you find new clients? Most advisers rely on referrals to get new business. Some others still do seminars, lunches, cold calling and networking events. Those techniques are good but there are more and more advisers turning to newer ways of attracting prospects to them. Techniques such Linkedin referrals, Facebook ads, blogging and webinars are quickly growing in favor with advisers. This is because they are less expensive and more profitable than the “old school” ways of getting new clients. But there’s also a steep learning curve to these. You shouldn’t let that stop you from testing them out. When you find the technique that works for you, stick with it and focus all your energy there.

Take five minutes and try to answer these four questions. And be honest with yourself. If you’re having trouble with one of the questions, start exploring new ways to try and answer it. If you need ideas, download the accompanying guide to help you out.

dave-zoller

 

Dave Zoller, CFP®
Financial Adviser
Streamline My Practice
Warrenville, IL


Leave a comment

Overcome 4 Business Challenges with Tech and Training

Advisers are being sold technology to solve their problems at every corner, said Greg Friedman, founder, CEO and president of Private Ocean.

“Technology is so oversold to all of us,” Friedman said at a recent FPA Retreat 2017 session.

It’s a combination of technology and staff training that is the key to managing business challenges, Friedman said. He knows this because during his time in the industry, he’s seen some things.

“I am the poster child for every problem this industry has,” Friedman said, who started Friedman and Associates in 1991 at age 28 with two associates—his twin toddlers—and now the company has “evolved through all stages.” Private Ocean—the result of a merger between Friedman and Associates and Salient Wealth Management—now has 24 full-time employees and seven advisers.

Friedman gave attendees tips on how to solve the four common business challenges—business development, marketing, time management and efficiency.

Utilize available technology. Prospecting becomes easier if you have software that can show you how you are possibly connected to prospects. Friedman uses Relationship Science, which allows planners to plug in a name and see all the connections that adviser potentially has with that prospect.

Marketing automation is another helpful piece of technology. When prospects enter their email on your site, the automation will automatically send the prospect something and then notify you when you have a bite, Friedman said.

Don’t forget CRM.

“CRM is core,” Friedman emphasized. “I don’t care which ones you use, but use one.”

Develop and reward employees. Friedman said having the staff on board is a must for success.

“Having that data and having those systems means nothing if people don’t know how to use it or know how to get clients,” he said, also suggesting that firms provide ongoing sales training and coaching. If advisers are uncomfortable with “sales” training, call it “relationship,” “communication,” or “consulting” training.

Designing a compensation structure that rewards top advisers while not penalizing advisers who don’t meet goals is a way to motivate advisers, Friedman said.

Implement service models effectively. It’s unsustainable to give an eclectic mix of clients the full range of your services, so pick the clients who may not be a match for you and figure out a way to gently steer them to a more appropriate firm or planner.

Also, define what your services are and make more efficient assignments, giving the simple client cases to junior associate advisers and free up time of your more experienced advisers to take on the more profitable, complex clients.

Outsource when needed. Private Ocean outsources some of its marketing efforts to a company called Set Wave, which helps it use social media in the most effective ways.


Leave a comment

Safeguard Yourself Against Litigation

When unhappy clients lose money and decide to sue somebody, chances are that somebody is you.

“You don’t have to have done something wrong to get sued,” Greg Severinghaus, marketing manager and senior underwriter of Markel Cambridge Alliance, said in a breakfast session April 25 at FPA Retreat at Chateau Elan in Georgia.

Markel_Greg S

Greg Severinghaus of Markel Cambridge Alliance presented the session, “Improve Client Relations to Limit Litigation” at FPA Retreat 2017.

Severinghaus said many advisers he works with don’t think they could ever get sued. They tell him they’ve got good client agreements and they get good results. But then they get sued for something frivolous or something that wasn’t their fault.

For example, he said, an adviser he worked with interviewed with a married couple who never even signed on as clients who eventually sued him.

“We spent $50,000 defending him,” Severinghaus explained. That was a small claim, he said. The bigger claims run into the millions.

Severinghaus said there are many areas in which advisers get sued most, and he offered tips on how to safeguard yourselves:

Execution errors. Advisers frequently get sued for making trade errors. This is the most frequent source of loss for advisers who manage assets.  To safeguard from this, Severinghaus suggested advisers put basic policies and procedures in place to reduce the magnitude of errors. For example, match every order against confirmations and promptly resolve discrepancies.

Also, keep a log of erroneous trades to look for patterns and promptly address them.

Finally, maintain a discretionary fund to address erroneous trades before they get worse. Fix errors as soon as possible.

Client selection and deselection. Focus on onboarding clients who will take your advice. Steer clear of clients who are overspenders, who won’t take your advice, who are unwilling to take effective risk, who are not in need of the services you provide, who are unethical or who are high maintenance.

Clients who overspend are particularly prone to bring lawsuits against you.

“When the money runs out, they’re going to blame somebody and it’s always the person managing their money,” Severinghaus said.

Documentation. This is the biggest piece in defending yourself against litigation. Document everything—every client interaction and meeting—especially if the client did not take your advice. At your quarterly meetings, have the client sign documents noting they understand the reports and your recommendations.

Clients don’t always tell the truth, Severinghaus said, so having proof of what was said at your interactions is key.

“Competent behavior requires ongoing documentation,” Severinghaus said.

Wire fraud. This is a hot-button topic in recent years. More advisers are getting duped into wiring their clients’ money to clever hackers who have enough knowledge of the clients to be convincing.

If you suspect an email is fraudulent, pick up the phone and verify with your client that it was in fact them who contacted you. Don’t trust voice recognition either. When a client calls asking for something you think may be out of character, ask them if you can call them back with the number on file just to verify.

Also, ask questions fraudsters won’t know, and don’t send pre-filled wire instructions.


1 Comment

5 Steps to ‘Connecting the Room’

One of life’s simple pleasures for me is something that others might dread: public speaking. For more than 20 years I’ve had the honor and privilege to speak in front of a wide range of audiences—investors, financial advisers, insurance agents and wholesalers.

A rookie financial adviser client of mine explained that he had held his first seminar and it had resulted in setting several appointments with qualified prospects. However, he was disappointed overall because he said that the audience barely said a word during his entire presentation. Even when he would ask them a question or attempt to interact with them, the room was silent.

If this has ever happened to you, please know that it happens to most speakers at some point in their careers. To combat that challenge, I’ve developed a solution that I refer to as “connecting the room.” If you apply this technique, I’m pretty sure you will never just hear crickets during your presentation again.

The following is a step-by-step process for connecting the room.

Step 1: Ask Strategic Questions

It’s no secret that the audience tends to be more engaged at listening when you ask them questions. That’s why it’s important to map out your questions prior to your presentation so that you have a strategy ahead of time.

Typically, I tend to start off a new subject with a question. An example of this was years ago when I prepared one set of questions for each section of my presentation. Instead of reading the Power Point slide titled “Inflation Eats up Your Purchasing Power,” I simply asked a strategic question to the group of retirees, which was, “How many people here paid more for their last car then they did their first house?”

Step 2: Get the Audience to Take Action

Another great way to help the audience connect with one another is to collectively ask them to take action by raising their hand. After I asked the earlier question, I paused and said, “Let’s see a show of hands of who can relate to that. Please raise your hand if you can.”

Immediately, several hands went up.

Step 3: Make a Connection

Next, pick out one person who seems to be paying attention or actively listening so that you can ask them to tell their story to the crowd. Ask, “What is your name?” then simply turn the dialogue over to them by saying something like, “Joe, when did you buy your first house? What type of home was it (ex: rambler, townhouse, split-level, etc.)? Was it here in town or somewhere else?” Let this individual share the limelight for a moment then continue asking a few more questions. Examples might be, “What was the biggest purchase item aside from your home that you bought?” and “Do you think you the prices for items like that will continue to rise?” Your final question should be a closed-ended question which elicits a “yes” or a “no” so you can emphasize your point. Finish the interaction by thanking the person, “Joe, thanks for sharing! Who here can relate to Joe’s story? Let’s see a show of hands.”

Step 4: Connect the Room

Usually a group tends to listen more intently when a speaker is dynamic and uses dialogue, versus a speaker who is static and utilizes a monologue. If you sprinkle in interactions throughout your presentation, your audience will be waiting for them. Use as many as you can—as time permits—to solidify your messaging and to strengthen your connection with those in the room.

Step 5: Make Your Point

Before moving on from one topic to another be sure to ask a summarizing question. Here is an example, “Does anyone know why things are more expensive today than they were when you bought your first house?” Let someone offer an answer and then explain your point of view. You could say something like, “The reason things are more expensive is because inflation eats up your purchasing power!”

Transitioning from one topic to another is often the best time to engage with the audience and have the group collectively relate to each other. Be sure your questions are catered to the demographic to which you are speaking and that the questions support your point of view.

Why Connecting the Room Works

When you use this technique, watch what happens to the people in the room, they speak more freely and are more apt to want to speak with you afterwards and hopefully they are on their way to becoming one of your clients. If they feel comfortable then they feel connected!

To schedule a complimentary 30-minute coaching session with me at, email Melissa Denham, director of client servicing at Advisor Solutions.

Dan Finley

 

Daniel C. Finley
President
Advisor Solutions
St. Paul, Minn.

 

 


Leave a comment

Everything in Moderation: The Fine Line Between Sufficient and Excessive Passion

Could you have too much passion for your career? On the surface, that statement sounds ridiculous. Over and over, we hear everyone from professors to mentors to successful business people talk about the importance of being passionate about our livelihood. They insist that passion is an essential ingredient of professional success. In fact, many would argue the greater the passion, the better off you are.

So what’s the downside? I would imagine most of us don’t see much downside. When you love your job and you’re good at it, there are many reasons to give it extra attention. But we’ve all likely seen someone take this to extremes. When I see excessive passion, I can’t help but think of the maxim, “Everything in moderation.”

Ever worry someone you know has fallen so deep in their work that they’ve gone down the rabbit hole of excessiveness? There are a few telltale signs. Consider whether you have come across people who are:

  • So passionate about their latest idea for their business that they can’t hear the input of others? Every passion needs the balance of reason. Outside perspectives help people see new ideas from multiple angles. When people could gain input from trusted third parties and yet ignore it, they may be letting passion lead them by the nose.
  • So passionate about their livelihood that they get more satisfaction from work than anything else? These types of people preserve any free time for work endeavors in lieu of time they could spend on family, on hobbies or on their health. They simply love their work too much to see a problem with their behavior. If passion for work consistently trumps everything else, it’s going to eventually evolve into a lack of life balance. Some individuals may even rationalize their over-commitment to their livelihood as benefiting the family—without seeing how it’s actually creating rifts).
  • So passionate about their career that they loath the concept of retirement? When so much of a person’s self-identity is tied up in helping clients, trying to strengthen the firm’s reputation, and pushing for a higher level of financial worth, retiring may not be anywhere on their to-do list. People who fall in this category love their own perception of the role they play in the lives of others. But they could be wrong, as I discovered during a recent conversation with a newly retired adviser. He was amazed that none of his clients seemed to miss him after he retired. Somehow, he assumed they would be begging him to come back. The truth is we are all dispensable.

The real question you need to ask is this: when others think of the situations above, do they think of you? Passion can play out in wonderful ways; it can help your business thrive. Enthusiasm is catchy and can attract new clients and help you stay on top of all the news and updates you need to know to ensure that you have a successful firm; but if you go too far—if you burn yourself out or ignore the other parts of your life that deserve your focus—that’s when it’s time for a change. You may want to balance your passion with a bit of moderation.

Joni Youngwirth_2014 for webJoni Youngwirth
Managing Principal of Practice Management
Commonwealth Financial Network
Waltham, Mass.