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3 Levels of Trust and Why They Matter

In this year—2017—there is a “crisis of trust.”

So says the 2017 Edelman Trust Barometer, an annual global trust survey. Not since the study began tracking trust among the global population have they found such a broad decline in trust in all four key institutions—business, government, non-governmental organizations and media.

The 2016 survey noted that financial services are the least trusted industry of any they surveyed.

With the fall of trust, the majority of respondents now don’t believe that the system is working for them. In this climate, people’s societal and economic concerns turn into fears, spurring the rise of populist actions which have played out across the globe.

Such is the importance of forging trust among your clients. When it comes to trust there are three levels and advisers should know each one in order to be more trustworthy in the eyes of your clients.

As the chair of financial and legal innovation at ForbesBooks, and as a former financial coach, I’ve spent a lot of time focusing on the issue of trust. Trust is the foundation of the financial adviser–client relationship. We all know that. It’s particularly crucial when somebody is in a vulnerable position and with family and health, finances are among the most vulnerable areas we have.

Trust is a powerful intangible asset, defined differently by each client. Allen Harris, CEO of Berkshire Money Management, Inc., said that when it comes to the adviser-client relationship, trust is sometimes a too-easily-earned commodity. Clients want to trust their adviser and sometimes do so unquestioningly.

“Unfortunately, financial advisers don’t have to do much to earn that initial trust,” Harris said in a recent interview. “The client needs help and believes that someone with a shingle has their best interest at heart.”

study by the Wharton School looked at three levels of trust between advisers and clients. The first is trust in knowhow. Investors are looking for someone whose competence inspires trust. This first level addresses the question, “Do you know what you’re doing?”

“Many people find advisers by way of referral, so they feel they can trust the adviser because someone else trusts them,” Harris told us in a recent interview. “But why did that first person trust the adviser? Maybe the adviser did something to earn that trust, but maybe not. Clients get lucky a lot, because most every adviser is a good person who means to do good. But like in any profession, that’s not always true. So the client rationalizes trust by a gut feeling, a referral or a slick brochure.”

The second level is trust in ethical conduct. This level addresses the question, “Do I trust you not to steal money from me?”

“If you are trying to protect from embezzlement, that’s easy,” Harris said. “You want a public held, highly regulated, closely scrutinized custodian of your assets. Then the client always has the access to and the ability to view their money.”

If the client is trying to protect from malpractice, one big problem is that the SEC and FINRA do not allow investment performance. Don’t get me wrong—investment performance isn’t the thing that should be a deciding factor, but it should be a benchmark to be sure clients make money when the market goes up but also that the adviser is proactive in protecting the portfolios during down times. That’s the type of referral you really want.”

The third level of trust is trust in empathetic skills. This level addresses the question, “Do you care about me?” There is no formula for this one. CNBC sites a study released by the CFA Institute which shows that so-called soft skills—typically things such as relationship-building and interpersonal communication—will be more important than technical skills in the coming years.

These attributes—a proven track record, an ethical reputation and sincere empathy—inspire trust on all three levels. For financial advisers, trust is not simply a nice thing to have, but a critical strategic asset.

Harper Tucker
Harper Tucker is the chair of Financial and Legal Innovation Practice and vice-president of Authority Marketing, a leading the author acquisition process for ForbesBooks and Advantage Media Group


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5 Signs It’s Time to Move On from a Prospect

Have you ever had a high net worth prospect who seemed semi-interested in working with you but you just couldn’t quite get them off the fence? You’ve called several times; maybe you’ve even met with them and offered recommendations, but something is holding them back from taking that final step to becoming a client. Then, your prospecting efforts become unreturned voicemails or vague replies to your emails. If this sounds familiar, maybe it’s time to acknowledge the signs and realize it’s time to move on.

Following is a brief overview of what I tell my clients to look for and how to know when to let go.

Sign No. 1: A Family Member in the Business

Most experienced advisers and agents know that when a prospect says, “I have a brother in-law in the business but I’d be interested in hearing what you have to say,” it probably means that they don’t completely trust their relative, however it doesn’t guarantee that they’d change anything. Instead, they most likely will consider your recommendations, talk it over with their relative and still not end up working with you. The reason is because relatives are just too awkward to walk away from when it comes to business dealings.

If you run across this type of prospect, qualify them right away by saying something like this, “If we identify some need for changes in your portfolio, are you in a position to do business with me?” This will help you identify how serious they are about working with you.

Sign No. 2: Wanting to Split their Business

Some prospects may like your recommendations but not want to sever ties with their current adviser or agent. The reason is simple, it’s because they are familiar and have established trust with that person. They don’t know you but they might consider working with you on a trial basis.

Unfortunately, many times they are doing this with the caveat that they can compare results and then let go of the adviser/agent that doesn’t do as well for them. If this scenario is offered—working with you to “see what happens”—it’s important for you to reply like this, “I’m sorry but the clients I work with need to provide reasonable time for my process and recommendations to come to fruition.” When you stand by your value, you may lose a prospect now and again but you maintain your self-respect. As a result, you also build a better client base.

Sign No. 3: They Took Your Recommendations and Bought Online

Years ago, I had a prospect take several of my recommendations and purchase them in an online account. He felt there was nothing wrong with it since it saved him money. I on the other hand believe that if the relationship starts off on the wrong foot, it will end up remaining that way. This type of prospect is merely showing you that they don’t value your services. If this happens, you need to be ready to walk away.

Sign No. 4: You are Chasing a Ghost

At some point, you will have a prospect that needs to “think about it” or “review things.” When you follow-up they may not return your calls. The reason is because they didn’t see the value in your recommendations in the first place.

There may have been a concern or objection that you didn’t address. If this happens, simply leave a message like this, “Hi ______, this is _______ with _______. I have a quick question that only you can answer. Could you please call me when you hear this? My number is _________.” This is what I refer to as the “curiosity message.” If they aren’t curious enough to call you back, they really aren’t interested in doing business with you. If they do call, you need to ask them something directly like, “Are you still interested in (insert three benefits here).” If they are, then set another appointment with them to do the paperwork.

Sign No. 5: You Just Don’t Like the Prospect

If you find yourself dreading any type of communication with a specific prospect (email, phone call or appointments) then you certainly do not want to work with them. No matter how much business you think they can provide, inform them that you might not be an appropriate fit and they could be better served by someone who could provide more of what they are looking for.

Why Watching for Warning Signs is Important

This is not an easy business but when you make a conscious choice to work with people who want to work with you, you can make things much easier on yourself. That’s why it is so important to watch for warning signs that it’s time to move on from a prospect. Life is too short to chase those who don’t see your value.

If you are ready to take your business to the next level, schedule a complimentary 30-minute coaching session with me by emailing Melissa Denham, director of client servicing.

Dan Finley
 Daniel C. Finley is the president and co-founder of Advisor Solutions, a business consulting and coaching service dedicated to helping advisers build a better business.

 

 


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Seize the Summer with These 3 Growth Activities

Summertime can be a wonderful time to relax and recharge your batteries after a tough spring. But it can also be a great time to grow. Many advisers and their staff have excess capacity at this time of year, as clients are off on vacation. So, before you leave work early, stop and think about what a productive summer could mean for your business. You could be in high-growth mode come September instead of looking at a long list of tasks you need to complete before year-end. Here are three ways to help you get there.

Here are three growth activities you can do this summer:

1.) Connect with clients. Summer offers many opportunities to strengthen relationships with your best clients. Be sure to actively listen when clients talk about their vacation plans. If they are traveling to a particular destination, follow up with an article or item geared toward their trip. For example, clients going to a cooking school in France might love a whisk, along with a note saying you hope they whip up some wonderful summer memories. Clients heading to a national park might be thrilled to read a timely article on the “10 Things You Didn’t Know About Yellowstone.” These types of gestures could get clients talking about you, leading to introductions to potential new clients.

There’s another benefit to active listening: the ability to source names to follow up on at another time. Who is on the client’s tennis doubles team or golf foursome? Who will be at the lake house? Who’s coming to town for the family reunion? Be sure to add these names to your CRM system or database to keep your pipeline of prospects full and healthy.

2) Get to know clients’ families and friends. Are children, grandchildren or other relatives coming to town? Mention that you’d be delighted to meet them. Perhaps clients are hosting a barbecue you could attend. Or maybe there’s a Little League game in your area where you could watch their son or granddaughter pitch. Imagine their surprise and delight to find you in the bleachers, cheering on their young ones. And if you bring along a small cooler with popsicles or ice cream treats for after the game, you can quickly get introduced to a large number of players (and their parents) and make a great first impression. It’s a great way to turn clients into advocates for you.

3) Leverage community events. Many cities and towns hold free summer events that you can spin into your own unique entertainment offering. Invite clients to attend an outdoor movie in your community, and bring along blankets, popcorn, movie treats and soda to hand out. Or suggest clients come enjoy a band concert in the town square with you, and offer them wine and cheese while they relax to the music. (You’re likely to have clients introduce you to others, too, in a casual setting like this.)

Remember to take pictures (get permission, of course), and leverage the event even further by sharing those images on your website, blog or social media channels. The opportunity to delight your clients and meet potential new ones is all around you this time of year.

Make this summer fun—but make it matter to your business. When you prioritize connecting with clients, and getting to know their friends and families, you’ll create a pipeline full of prospects that can propel your business forward. And you’ll be well positioned to capture business leading into the end of the year.

Kristine_McManus_2_lg
Kristine McManus, is the chief business development officer of Commonwealth Financial Network.


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5 Tips to Help You Take Charge of Your Social Media Strategy

If your biggest challenge as a financial planner is finding and acquiring new clients, you’re not alone. Nearly two-thirds of financial planners recently surveyed by the Financial Planning Association listed “client acquisition” as their top challenge.

And yet, the money and skillset required to come up with an effective prospecting—and what it might take to execute the plan—can make attracting new clients seem impossible.

While certainly not a magic bullet on its own, social media can be a cost-effective way to build your personal and professional brand and connect with potential clients in a genuine, authentic manner.

This post offers five tips to help clear up common misconceptions about using social media in business and to help you begin building a social-driven prospecting strategy from the ground up.

1.) Recognize the Uses of Each Platform. One mistake when using social media is to immediately build a profile on every platform without thinking through how to create or curate content for each separate entity.

Placing the exact same content on multiple platforms can make your brand look lazy and out of touch. What works on Instagram may be the opposite of what drives engagement on LinkedIn. Further, creating and curating the amount of content required to run a functional blog/website and generate activity on four to five separate social platforms is simply not an option for most small businesses.

Avoid the temptation to build a profile on any social outlet until you have worked out why and how you plan to use the platform. Here are a few tips on some of the heaviest hitters:

LinkedIn is primarily a professional network, and the content that performs best on the platform follows suit. Investopedia reports in its article “LinkedIn: How Advisors Can Use It to Grow” that nearly three-quarters of U.S. advisers maintain a profile, so it may be a good place to look at focusing your initial efforts.

Facebook and Instagram are more personal, with Instagram focusing heavily on imagery. This is not to say that you can’t or shouldn’t have a profile on these platforms, as many advisers do—it all depends on the type of clients you’re trying to reach, the content you are looking to create and/or share and whether you can support many platforms at once.

Twitter is essentially a newsfeed and, while the content required for each post is smaller in volume (140-character limit), the platform requires a larger volume of posts to maintain a semblance of activity.

2.) Find Your Formula. Businesses that use the social platforms for promotion often treat the content as a one-way street to aggressively push product and sales-related information. In his blog post “Why Content is Fire and Social Media is Gasoline,” marketing guru Jay Baer said, “Social media was not intended to be the world’s shortest press release.” I believe social media was designed to replicate human conversation, and building a healthy following is dependent on how well you tell your personal and professional story.

While advisers are somewhat limited in how much they can engage in two-way discussions on social media, one area that can make a major difference is in how you curate and deliver content. If your profile summary, original posts and retweets on Twitter reflect the tone of a sales brochure, you risk driving people away.

Instead, as you’re crafting your profile, writing your first few posts and deciding what to retweet or share, think about how you prefer to get to know someone when you meet in a face-to-face conversation. What do you want people to know about you? What are the things that are most important to you? What defines you? Answering these questions will help you frame your presence in a way that best reflects who you really are.

My good friend (and social media expert) Steffen Kaplan (@SpinItSocial) shared a formula for building an online presence that I have found to be unbelievably valuable, especially when it comes to attracting followers on Twitter. He recommends parsing the content you create, what you share and what you like into three separate buckets: one-third of your posts should be designed to create awareness about your business (think of this as your “branded” content), another third should be personal (answering the questions outlined above) and the last third should be content designed to engage and inspire (quotes, photos and videos that might make others smile).

3.) Share Content That Tells Your Story. Most advisers know they need to do a better job promoting their practice and value proposition, but many don’t consider themselves to be marketers or know where to start in communicating with prospective clients. In the past, promotion didn’t matter as much, as a high percentage of new clients came via referrals from happy customers.

In today’s world, communications should be more persuasive and educational than a simple list of your services. But who has time to create all that content and send it to the right people at the right time? The beauty of the level of saturation in the blogging and social media world is that you don’t need to spend all your time creating your own materials—you can easily find educational content that you appreciate and share it with your clients.

When you share content, you are advocating for the message of the material, and that’s often the closest thing to putting your name on it. Beyond saving time and money, shared content comes with its own set of advantages as it allows you to send powerful messages from a credible third party. Relevant, useful and valuable content is an effective way to build trust with current and prospective clients. As content marketing expert Drew Davis puts it, “Content builds relationships. Relationships are built on trust. Trust drives revenue.”

4.) Don’t Overdo It. You don’t have to post content 50 times a day to be successful. Sure, social media requires creating and posting content with a high level of frequency, but that doesn’t mean you must spend your entire day brainstorming your next tweet.

Like any other marketing medium, social media success depends on the quality of the content you distribute—including the actual post, the attached image or GIF and the post’s linked content. To help focus on quality over quantity (and maintain your sanity), create a simple editorial calendar and plan out posts for each week or month. You can find countless free content calendar templates with a quick online search, but a traditional printed cat or firefighter calendar will also work just fine.

5.) Have Fun! Seriously, have some fun with it and do your best to be you. Your readers and followers will appreciate it, and it will make your content better in the long run.

Happy Tweeting!

Disclaimer: Before you go down this path, it’s important to understand FINRA’s regulations surrounding the use of social media, as well as any guidelines provided by your broker-dealer or RIA, if applicable.

Dan_Martin_Headshot
Dan Martin is the director of marketing for the Financial Planning Association®, the principal professional organization for CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER (CFP®) professionals, educators, financial services professionals and students who seek advancement in a growing, dynamic profession. He is an award-winning author with a diverse financial services industry background in marketing and communications. He earned a journalism degree from the University of Denver and his MBA in marketing from the Daniels College of Business.


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Pay Attention to the Details: Don’t Overlook the Obvious in Portfolio Construction

We all want to build great portfolios for our clients. But in our effort to gain a performance advantage for our clients sometimes we overlook the obvious.

In 2010, Morningstar studied the relationship between low fees and mutual fund performance. They found: “In every asset class over every time period, the cheapest quintile produced higher total returns than the most expensive quintile.”

Vanguard did a study in 2015 that measured the effectiveness of different factors in predicting mutual fund performance. They found: “The ex-ante expense ratio separated poorly performing funds from better performing funds more successfully than all other metrics…”

In another Vanguard study, they compared the returns of mutual funds in the lowest cost quartile with funds in the highest cost quartile in different asset classes over the 10 years ending in 2013. Again, the low-cost funds beat the high cost funds in every asset class.

Clearly you don’t get more by paying more. Here’s how to incorporate this reality into your investment process.

Keep a watchful eye on:

  • The internal expenses of the funds and ETFs in your portfolios
  • Ongoing trading and rebalancing costs incurred in managing the portfolios

Almost everyone understands the theoretical importance of keeping an eye on fees and expenses, but far fewer do it in practice. Yet it can make a huge difference to your clients over their investment time horizon. Here are some examples. (All transaction costs are estimates that include allowance for the bid/ask spread on ETFs.)

Let’s say you have a client who needs a standard 60/40 balanced portfolio. The average expense ratio for a balanced fund in the Morningstar database is about 87 basis points. You could buy the “average balanced fund,” or you could build a perfectly good balanced portfolio with internal expenses of under 10 basis points using ETFs. The difference is 77 basis points.

If you build your client an eight-position portfolio using ETFs, the transaction costs might be around $80. Or you could build a 16-position portfolio using actively managed funds. That might cost around $320. The difference is about 24 basis points for a $100,000 account.

If you rebalance your eight-position portfolio annually and trade one-quarter of your positions, your annual rebalancing costs could be about $20. If you rebalance your 16-position portfolio quarterly and trade one-quarter of your positions each quarter, your annual rebalancing costs would be $320. That’s an annual difference of about 30 basis points for a $100,000 account.

You can see how fees, expenses and transaction costs can add up and detract from your clients’ long-term investment returns. In the Morningstar study referred to earlier they found: “Each 1 percent in additional fees eats up 28 percent of the ending value of an account over a 35-year span.” You can see that saving even 1 percent annually could fund years of additional retirement for your clients.

My point is not to advocate for the use of ETFs or for any particular approach to portfolio management. But I do want to underscore the significant impact that paying attention to the details can have on a client’s long-term financial well-being.

It’s easy to build portfolios with many high-cost positions and trade them frequently. Some people might even equate the complexity, all the moving parts and the frequent activity with more sophistication. But, as Leonardo da Vinci said, “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”

scott-mackillop
Scott MacKillop is CEO of First Ascent Asset Management, a Denver, Colo.-based firm that provides investment management services to financial advisers and their clients. He is a 40-year veteran of the financial services industry. He can be reached at scott@firstascentam.com.

 

 


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DOL Deconstructed: Regulations, Guidance and Suggestions on Documenting Alternative Investment Due Diligence

With phase one of the Department of Labor’s fiduciary rule having gone into effect on June 9, 2017, financial advisers must comply with “impartial conduct standards,” which require that advice be in the best interest of retirement investors.

The best interest standard has two primary components: prudence (professional standard of care), and loyalty (based on the interests of the customer rather than the adviser or firm). Advisers are also required to charge clients no more than reasonable compensation. The final phase of the rule is set to go into effect on January 1, 2018. See the DOL’s Transition Period Q&A here.

For most advisers, compliance with the impartial conduct standards is simple—most already give advice that is in the best interest of their clients. What may not be so simple is documenting adherence to the standards now that they will be more scrutinized. In this article, we will discuss the current regulation and offer guidance around alternative investment documentation.

Key Language on Documentation from the Regulation and Guidance

Here is a list of key language and documentation you should familiarize yourself with:

DOL Fiduciary Rule (client interactions): Broker dealers, financial advisers and registered investment advisers (RIAs) “must document why recommendations were in a client’s best interest,” including, but not limited to, the type of account used, the products that are recommended, and why the recommendation was in the client’s best interest at the time it was made. Read more from the Department of Labor here.

NASD Notice to Members 03-71 (non-conventional investments): In addition to establishing written procedures for supervisory and compliance personnel, “members must also document the steps they have taken to ensure adherence to these procedures.” Read the full FINRA notice here.

FINRA Regulatory Notice 10-22 (Regulation D offerings): In order to demonstrate that it has performed a reasonable investigation, a BD “should retain records documenting both the process and the results of its investigation of Reg D offerings.” Read the full FINRA notice here.

What to Document in Alternative Investments Due Diligence?

The process. Document your processes for identifying alternative investment opportunities. Keep a file of the list of any and all sectors, asset classes, products, and managers reviewed. Documentation tip: Keep a log of any screens you have run to narrow the universe of investment opportunities available to your clients, as well as a log of any training or education you have completed while conducting your research.

Fees, characteristics, risks and rewards. Ensure documentation of how you are educating yourself on the strategies considered. Most importantly, you’ll want to document your review of a product’s fees (especially in relation to other similar products), investment characteristics, key risks and rewards and how management intends to meet the product’s objectives. Keep an initial file and ensure you have a way to track the most up-to-date key documents and interviews with managers. Key documents include any fee comparison reports, the offering documents, performance information, brochures, quarterly/annual reports, ADVs, and any other available data. Documentation tip: Try to meet or speak with key decision-making personnel for the investment manager if possible and have them explain how they intend to meet their stated investment objectives.

Operational due diligence and analysis. Document your audit of a firm’s operational structure, adherence to compliance requirements, background checks and any red flags that may arise. Many advisers and broker-dealers rely on third-party due diligence providers for this step. Documentation tip: While it is common for third-party diligence firms to be utilized for this important step in the due diligence process, it is important to remember that you may not rely solely on a third party for due diligence. You must be familiar with the content of any third-party reports and any red flags highlighted in these reports. Document the follow-up on red flags and any conclusions.

Ongoing monitoring. Due diligence does not stop with an initial review. It is important to remember that a sound due diligence process means continually performing analysis on each manager, updating your key documents on a quarterly basis, conducting formal meetings and monitoring the portfolio for any changes or red flags. Documentation tip: Document any and all ongoing due diligence and ensure you are set up to receive notices of important events for alternative investment programs and managers.

Summary

Keep hard copies, use electronic storage and/or consider using a third party to track training and education, due diligence, research and compliance. Keep an easily accessible trail of your due diligence efforts, whether electronically or on paper, to easily demonstrate what you have done including not only the results of your due diligence but the process you followed. (Note: SEC Rules17a-3 and 17a-4 stat that during the first two years, records must be kept in a readily accessible place. Most documents must be kept for up to six years, depending on the document, although formation and organizational documents must be kept indefinitely). Always remember, if it isn’t documented, it didn’t happen!

Laura Sexton
Laura Sexton is senior director of program management at AI Insight. She holds her bachelor’s degree in education from Purdue and has held the FINRA Series 7, 24 and 66 securities and life insurance licenses. She resides in Massachusetts with her husband and two children. Visit her on LinkedIn.

 

Editor’s note: a version of this post first appeared on the AI Insight blog in March 2017.

 


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Be A Gen Savvy Planner: Take Off Your Generational Lenses

Our early environments shape us for the rest of our lives.

That’s why there is so much difference between the generations, said Cam Marston, an expert on generational change and founder of Generational Insights.

Marston told FPA Retreat attendees in April that baby boomers are tough and were never told they were unique or special, so they overcompensated by telling their kids—who are Gen-Xers and millennials—that they were extra special. Therefore, those two generations were raised to think they were unique and that their needs were very important.

“What imprints on younger people impacts them for the rest of their lives,” Marston said. “Millennials and Gen-X have been brought up to say, ‘What’s going to make me happy?’

Planners should understand the vast differences between the generations and know how to talk to and communicate with each one.

Boomers. To connect with the boomer, Marston said, you need to understand how they see the world. They’re hardworking and they have the mentality that retirement is going to be great. They want to hear your story and know where you come from.

Hanging up your diplomas or certificates in your office during your meetings with boomers is a good idea.

Key points about boomers:

1.) Understand and acknowledge their work ethic—which they generally measure in hours (i.e., “I work 50-60 hours a week”).

2.) Ask them about their accomplishments and acknowledge what they’ve done.

3.) Communicate that you are on the same page. Emphasize that you are a team.

5.) Pick up the phone and call them and meet with them in person.

6.) Beware of too much technology.

7.) Know the difference between “leading” baby boomers (older than 62 and like communication that emphasizes how they deserve retirement); and “trailing” baby boomers (ages 53-61 and need to be reassured that they’re going to be OK despite setbacks they experienced in retirement savings thanks to the recession).

Gen-Xers. This generation are stalkers of product and services. They demand to be an educated consumer and are leery of “being had,” Marston said. They are interested in how well you can teach them to make a good decision. Your relationship should be a partnership.

Key points about Gen-Xers:

1.) They are going to do research and have you prove why your advice is better than what they found via this research.

2.) They tend to prefer email and your communication should be brief, succinct and to the point.

3.) Don’t waste your time leaving them voicemails.

4.) Make sure your web presence is pristine—they’ll look you up online before contacting you.

5.) The Gen-X mother has tremendous buying power and influence. She’s coming up in terms of her earning, she’s informed and she’s fully engaged. Keep her happy.

6.) Communicate how decisions will affect them personally.

Millennials. Millennials are individuals with a group orientation. They believe they’re unique but they also enjoy being part of a group.

Millennials think, “You tell me about me and what’s going to happen and how I’m going to feel about it,” Marston said.

Key points about millennials:

1.) They’re optimistic.

2.) You will get more attendance from them if you ask them to bring people. Engage them as a group and they will be more interested.

3.) They feel they are unique and special.

4.) They don’t think so much in the long-term as the other generations.

5.) They are achieving milestones (i.e., getting married, buying houses, having kids) later in life than the previous generations.

6.) Communicate via text messages and social media.

Understand these key points about each generation and try to see the world through their eyes when you’re talking to them.

“Everybody pitches and articulates their value from their own generational lense,” Marston said, “but I’ve got to take my lenses off and put on somebody else’s.”

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Ana Trujillo Limón is associate editor of the Journal of Financial Planning and the editor of the FPA Practice Management Blog. Email her at alimon@onefpa.org