Connecting with Clients Who Aren’t Tech Savvy

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Many of us tend to stereotype clients of a certain age as “too old” to be tech savvy. After all, the average age in terms of tech savviness gets younger every day. But what if you take a different perspective? Perhaps clients are never too old. Indeed, maybe they would even welcome the opportunity to step up their use of technology!

Let’s start with this scenario: You want your clients to be knowledgeable and comfortable using technology for a review meeting. That way, if they relocate to a warmer climate or are no longer physically able to come to the office, for example, you can still stay connected. Plus, you may believe (as some planners do) that technology-based review meetings are not only more concise but also higher quality. So, what does it take to prepare clients who may not seem tech savvy for a technology-based review meeting?

Beta Best Practices

A good place to start is with a beta approach. Here, there are a few best practices to keep in mind. First, brainstorm a list of two to five clients who you think would be good candidates for a beta test. Reach out to them, explaining to each one the value of conducting a remote review meeting using technology. Then, simply ask them if they would like to participate. If no, end of story. If yes, it’s time to get started.

For this example, we’ll use the iPad as our technology of choice, although there are certainly other options that could work. You’ll need to set up your iPads using the appropriate links so they provide a secure connection. Remember, less is more. The goal is to make it easy for clients by having only the essentials available on the iPad.

Once the iPads have everything they need for clients to connect to a meeting, send them to beta users for the sole purpose of the review meeting. To help familiarize clients with how to use it, include easy-to-understand instructions either with the iPad or directly on it. You might also schedule a phone call to provide a short training session. Now, it’s time to put it to the test.

Try the iPads for one meeting shortly after the training—maybe even the next day. Ask for feedback! If your clients like it, plan on using the iPad for the next review meeting. If not? Simply have them return the iPads to you.

Hidden Benefits and Risks

Of course, there are some clients who don’t even own a computer. You might find that these individuals are the ones who may ask you to talk with their tech-savvy kids. That’s a good thing—and a great opportunity. The kids may see you as taking a novel approach to supporting their parents. On the other hand, what if this strategy is so wildly successful that clients start contacting you 10 times a day? As mentioned above, be sure to establish that the iPad is for review meetings only. Any communication in between meetings can be handled the traditional way—a phone call.

Finally, what if your clients talk to others about how they have reviews with their planner via iPad and from the comfort of their own homes? Positive word of mouth is always a good thing. Plus, innovation presents your firm as young and vital.

Technology Supports Human Connection

Individuals born with technology in hand will be more sophisticated than those who adopt it in their 40s. But millennials are actually the ones who have the most to gain from ideas like this. Who knows where the concept of providing an iPad could lead? What would it mean for clients who adopt this idea to be reminded of you with a beautiful photo, a joke of the day or an inspirational quote? These simple reminders can support the human connection if the foundation is properly laid—in this case—by using an iPad as an enhancement to human relationships.

Now, I know this particular approach won’t be for everyone. If not, what novel idea can you try that can help you stay connected to—and show how much you care about—your clients?

Joni Youngwirth_2014 for web

Joni Youngwirth is managing principal of practice management at Commonwealth Financial Network in Waltham, Mass.

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