The Financial Implications of Selling Your Practice

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Prior to selling a financial advisory practice, along with selecting the right buyer, it’s important to be knowledgeable about the financial aspects, including: price versus value and the aspects of the deal.

Price Versus Value
To begin, it’s important to know the difference between valuation and price. For example, you may think your practice is worth a certain dollar amount because of the hard work you have put into it and the wonderful clients you have, however the valuation may show otherwise.

Valuation looks at the entire enterprise value of the firm based on the methodology that is most appropriate for a given situation. Most valuation approaches are classified as: income approach (net value plus future potential); market approach (comparison to similar practices); and asset-based approach (tangible net assets determine fair market value).

While the debate continues as to which is best, and rules of thumb are suggested, the best advice is to seek multiple valuations.

When preparing for your valuation, the following factors are often key determinants for buyers and lenders:

Age of your clients. If a large number of them are nearing retirement, they may be considered less valuable than younger clients who are in the accumulation phase.

Number of clients. A smaller number of clients with higher net worth are easier to manage than a large number with fewer assets.

A buyer will also look at the current profitability of your firm and the amount of growth you have experienced over the past years. Equally important will be how you manage your business. For example, fee-based income is more predictable and looked at more favorably by lending agencies.

Aspects of the Deal
How you are willing to structure payments is an important element of the sale and can affect the buyer’s and loan company’s willingness to participate. Unfortunately, there is no boilerplate formula. On average payment terms were split between three payment types:

  • Down payment: 36 percent
  • Promissory note: 55 percent
  • Earn-out: 9 percent

Advisers need to keep in mind that a sizable down payment may be impractical because the assets are intangible. The bank can’t repossess a book of investments.

However, there are institutes that are set up to make loans of this type. The buyer or seller might also contact his or her B/D or custodian to see if it has a program available.

The promissory note allows the seller to receive fair value over a reasonable amount of time. Most sellers are paid in full within three to five years.

The earn-out compensates the seller a percentage of future revenues based on future performance. Performance can be based on gross revenue, AUMs, net acquired assets or any other measure both parties agree too. It’s a good way for buyers to be protected against an under-performing firm or sellers to receive the full amount of its worth.

The important thing is to set up a deal that you feel okay with and the buyer will be able to find funding for.

phil-flakes

 

Phil Flakes
Co-founder
Succession Link
San Diego, Calif.

 

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