Avoid the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy: “I’m Not Good at Managing People”

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I’ve often heard advisers say that they are not good at managing people. I want to shake them and scold, “Don’t say that!” When you make such a declaration, you are doing nothing more than creating an excuse for not improving your skills. You may even be creating a self-fulfilling prophecy, in which your assumption that you aren’t good influences your behaviors and actually causes you to be less of a good manager than you naturally would be.

What Do Employees Want from Their Manager?
You can make a huge improvement in your self-perception, as well as in the perception of your employees, by focusing on some basic employee needs. Among the things employees want, there are two items that stand out, according to research by Gallup: knowing what’s expected of them and how they are doing in meeting those expectations.

These are fundamental needs of employees. That’s why human resources departments tell managers to have up-to-date job descriptions (to define what’s expected) and give employees performance reviews at least annually (to check in about whether expectations are being met). These two actions are not much to ask of an adviser and require that you learn just a couple of skills:

  • How to work with an employee to create a job description
  • How to have a meaningful conversation with an employee about his or her performance

Investing in Your Employees
A little time spent defining roles and responsibilities can go a long way for an adviser who wants an employee to be an important part of the future of his or her organization. Existing employees can be asked to do much of the task.

If you start with an employee who does not have a job description, give him or her a template that asks the employee to outline the key five to eight responsibilities of the job. You can make your own list for that position and then compare the two lists together to create an official description. From there, you can add the values you want to drive internally among everyone who is associated with the firm.

Use the description as the basis for performance reviews. A job description, although not perfect, is a good benchmarking tool and certainly better than using nothing. Again, work from a template to give employees the opportunity to outline how they think they have done in fulfilling their position’s key responsibilities over the past six months or year. If you do the same thing, comparing assessments will give you the fodder for great conversations regarding each employee’s performance.

Half the battle is making this investment in employees a priority and taking the time to do it. Based on the above approach, the time investment is really only a few hours per employee. That’s a good return on investment for employees whom you want to be part of the future of your firm.

Is that all you have to do be a great at managing people? No, but it’s a good jumping-off point. Above and beyond defined expectations, employees are highly influenced by the culture of an organization. We’ll talk more about that next time.

Joni Youngwirth_2014 for webJoni Youngwirth
Managing Principal of Practice Management
Commonwealth Financial Network
Waltham, Mass.

 

 

 

One thought on “Avoid the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy: “I’m Not Good at Managing People”

  1. Aren’t there legal, DoL implications around the job description as well?

    Like

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