Managing the Business Development Process: A Key to the True Ensemble

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According to a recent report by Cerulli Associates, financial advisers today are more likely to join an established RIA than to create their own advisory firm. Another study by InvestmentNews came to the same conclusion. Are these results surprising? Perhaps for some, but the talk regarding the emergence of ensemble firms has been around for more than a decade. Whether due to aging founder advisers who want their firms to continue after they’re gone, or to advisers who want to grow the top line, there is indeed a hiring frenzy by existing firms.

What happens after the frenzy has been satisfied and additional advisers are in place is another story. Unfortunately, “buyer’s remorse” can sometimes set in: Firm leaders who have failed to anticipate and prepare for the changes resulting from having additional advisers in the firm cannot achieve the intended results. So, what can be done to prevent this scenario?

As the leader of your organization, you should, of course, carefully craft the vision and business plan—and then drive that plan into reality. But one key to forming a true ensemble is the need to manage the business development process—sometimes referred to as the sales process.

Manage the Process
As advisers join your firm, they will need leadership and management to help them grow. You may find that it doesn’t cut it to go back to “business as usual” and focus your time as a financial adviser on only serving your clients. Be it loosely or with formality—and whether or not you call it “sales”—the business development process within a firm needs to be managed. To do this, consider the following:

  • Have individual advisers set revenue goals. This will yield the forecast on which future expenditures of the firm can be based. At least some of these expenditures should be for marketing efforts designed to gain new clients.
  • Track all activities. It is all too easy to service existing clients endlessly and never get around to prospecting. Keeping track of advisers’ revenue-generating activity will help provide some needed structure and balance to client-servicing activities.
  • Coordinate marketing events. This will ensure that firm-sponsored events and expenditures are embraced by all advisers within a firm.
  • Recognize success. Advisers need to be recognized for their achievements, as well as coached in areas where improvement is needed.
  • Evaluate techniques. By evaluating the effectiveness of different revenue-generating approaches, future time and energy can go into those prospecting activities with the highest return on investment. This is often referred to as tracking and assessing the effectiveness of endeavors of the sales funnel.

A Word to the Wise
If you love being a financial adviser and working directly with your clients but hate managing others and/or focusing on others’ growth, you might want to “stick to your knitting” and remain in a solo practice. And if you think that growing your business is as simple as finding another adviser to join your firm, think again. All work is a process—including business development.

Remember, you might establish a multi-adviser firm by hiring more advisers. But a key to forming a true ensemble includes actively managing your business development process.

Joni Youngwirth_2014 for webJoni Youngwirth
Managing Principal of Practice Management
Commonwealth Financial Network
Waltham, Mass.

One thought on “Managing the Business Development Process: A Key to the True Ensemble

  1. The whole discussion proved that It for business is perfect combination if you want success. This is best deal if you really want to improve management.

    Like

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