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Create the Courage to Make Lasting Change

During recent group and individual coaching sessions, I’ve noticed a common denominator between those who have experienced success and those who haven’t. Successful individuals are able to embrace change—be it the activities they are incorporating into their days, their acquisition of new skill sets or an increase in their overall awareness and accountability—and how it affects their business. Those less successful tend to fear change and mask their fear with excuses or procrastination.

In order to gather the courage to implement change regularly into the way you manage your business, you must first make a choice that where you are now isn’t where you want to be. You then need to decide to find alternatives to what is currently not working for you. Next, you must take action and tweak and evaluate on a consistent basis in order to end up with positive outcomes. All of this might seem simple in theory, but in reality, it’s difficult for many people I know.

3 Steps to Create Courage to Make Lasting Change

The following discusses each step. See if you can relate to what the adviser is going through when applying the process.

Step 1: Choose to Change. I have countless stories of advisers who say, “I know what I need to do, I just need to do it,” but then don’t. The interesting thing about this statement is that it actually reflects two important points. The first, “I know what I need to do,” reflects a level of awareness of what their solution is. The second part, “I just need to do it,” reflects the fear of not implementing the solution.

So why do people let fear paralyze them? Let’s discuss.

Take Bill K., a 25-year veteran adviser client of mine. In our initial coaching session he admitted that he hadn’t prospected in over a decade and that any new business that he had gotten was from clients as referrals. After additional conversations, he realized that he’d become comfortable only working with his client base and the thought of prospecting again filled him with anxiety because he remembered the amount of rejection he had experienced in his earlier years. Unfortunately, Bill didn’t have a choice because his employers had created new minimum gross production levels and he was never going to reach those targets unless he gathered additional assets.

Now, he was faced with two options, he needed to either prospect or eventually be forced to find another job. So, he chose to change and add prospecting back into his daily work.

Step 2: Find Direction. When faced with this type of situation, most advisers know the outcome that they want but don’t know the required steps to take them there. That’s why Bill called me. He needed a step-by-step process for gathering assets.

We first discussed his current business model and I was surprised to learn that he had virtually no assets in a fee-based platform. His concern was that he didn’t know how to convert his book so he’d never even tried. After reviewing his book, he determined that he had 72 households that would be good candidates to convert to fee-based and if that happened it would increase his turnover ratio which would get him ¾ of the way to his production goals for the following year. So we mapped out a process for converting his book.

Then, we strategized about his referral campaign to try and duplicate his top clients. We role-played a client-centered dialogue and he eventually felt like he had direction.

Step 3: Take Massive Action. All the planning in the world won’t help you if you don’t actually move forward with it. So, I decided to turn Bill becoming overwhelmed by compartmentalizing his goals into daily action steps, then even further into hourly activities so that he could focus on each campaign every day while still doing his regular business.

After Bill had his fee-based conversion campaign down he began converting his book. In addition, he used the client-centered referral dialogue that we had role-played, which got him actual referrals. Within three months he had transitioned most of the households earmarked for the campaign and was gathering assets from new clients. Taking massive action paid off for him.

Why Courage is the Key

The most important piece about Bill’s story is not his destination, but his journey. He began by realizing that he was being forced to get out of his comfort zone. It took real courage to reach out to me and admit that he didn’t know what to do but that he was willing to change. He was open to learning new processes and desired to take a leap of faith and apply them.

If you are ready to take your business to the next level, schedule a complimentary 30-minute coaching session with me by emailing Melissa Denham, director of client servicing.

 Dan Finley
Daniel C. Finley is the president and co-founder of Advisor Solutions, a business consulting and coaching service dedicated to helping advisers build a better business.

 

 


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Telling It Like It Is: What’s Your Truth?

Sometimes, it is just plain hard to see the truth—especially when we have a particularly difficult situation to confront. At times like these, everyone else seems to have 20/20 vision, while we may be blinded to what’s right in front of us.

In my experience, advisers are not immune to this difficulty, particularly when it comes to their business. Let’s take a look at some common scenarios I’ve seen over the years. As you read, I encourage you to ask yourself, does this sound like me?

The lingering practice. An adviser reaches a stage in his career where he is allowing his business to linger. It has gone beyond having a “lifestyle practice,” although those are the words he uses to describe it. The practice has been shrinking for years, the adviser has slacked off on staying up to date with industry developments and he has become sloppy in his interactions with clients. In fact, he has become quite lax in managing the business itself. Still, the adviser thinks he can continue down the same road, unable to see a reason to change.

The faux mentor. An adviser tells herself that she is acting as a mentor to an associate adviser. But what is she really doing? Simply providing a salary and a desk in the office. Of course, young advisers don’t learn by osmosis! They need face time with their mentors, as well as structured practice and feedback.

Business development (in)activity. An associate adviser believes he is actively pursuing business development. The reality, however, is that he is spending his time reading journals and perusing social media. There is no networking, no asking for meetings and no pursuit of new business. If questions about this lack of business activity come up? The adviser is quick to point out that he is busy servicing clients or analyzing the market.

Poor people management. A firm has high staff turnover, but the founder tells herself that this is due to a competitive marketplace, incompetent employees or poor hiring decisions. The core issue, however, is that the firm does not have strong people management practices in place. Performance reviews are given lip service, job descriptions do not exist and a culture of motivation is sorely lacking.

The flip side. Of course, “telling it like it is” may look quite different from the examples above. Plus, there is a flip side to consider: many advisers are (too) hard on themselves. For example, take the adviser who focuses only on the problems and all that is wrong. In fact, he is an excellent adviser to his clients, as well as an excellent CEO of his business. This, too, is a truth that should be acknowledged.

What’s Your Truth?

A hallmark of a good consultant is telling the truth. A hallmark of a great consultant is asking the questions that help you discover the truth for yourself. So, what are the hard truths you need to face? If you can’t find them, I encourage you to enlist the support of a great consultant to help you dig just a bit deeper.

Joni Youngwirth_2014 for web

Joni Youngwirth is managing principal of practice management at Commonwealth Financial Network in Waltham, Mass.


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Dos and Don’ts of Passing Down Your Practice

The average age of financial advisers in the U.S. has climbed north of 50 years old and approximately 43 percent of the total population of advisers are between ages 55 and 60. With so many advisers nearing retirement, the industry is facing a crisis when it comes to succession planning.

Typically, when the owner of a financial advisory practice wishes to retire, they’re faced with one of two choices: they can sell their firm to an institutional buyer, such as an RIA rollup shop, private equity firm or a regional acquirer; or they can bring in a junior partner and gradually introduce them to his or her clients and transition the book of business over bit by bit.

Ideally, firm owners prefer to transition their book of business to a junior partner over a five- to 10-year period. However, throughout my career helping small business owners transfer ownership of their firm and retire, I have found that financial planners ironically have some of the worst track records when it comes to successfully planning and executing an ownership transfer.

In this light, here are a few dos and don’ts when transitioning ownership of your business to a younger partner:

Don’t delay. It’s never too early to start the succession planning process, which can take more than a decade from start to finish. It takes years to introduce a new partner and provide them with the training and resources necessary to keep the business afloat. Too often do I see advisers continue to work into their senior years only to realize they have no exit strategy in place. Consider your clients; who is going to take care of them after you leave? And how are you going to monetize the business you’ve worked to build over the course of a lifetime?

Do get your younger partner involved in discussions and meetings with your larger, more significant clients throughout the transition process. Junior partners are typically brought on initially to handle an adviser’s smaller accounts. While this is all good and well in the beginning, it does not provide the new owner with the proper experience and training required to serve the bigger clients, which will be one of their primary responsibilities once ownership is transferred.

Don’t forget about the intangibles like the management style, likeability and cultural fit of the new owner. Some financial advisers still run a very formal shop with pressed white shirts and systemized client communication techniques. Others are more comfortable in khakis and a polo shirt, and prefer a more casual style of correspondence with clients. Also, does your new partner fit in well with other employees at the firm? Making sure you two see eye to eye in these categories can really smooth out the transition process, both for yourself and your clients.

Do go over the company’s financials. Not only must you teach the new partner how to handle your clients, you must also teach them how to run a business. What size client is most profitable? How does the business manage its costs? How do we manage the staff? Many new business owners overlook these extra responsibilities, which can be overwhelming at first. But as the outgoing partner, you need to make sure the business is left in a position to remain profitable. Typically, selling advisers are paid out in installments. If the business fails, these payments could stop, leaving the outgoing adviser in a sticky situation.

Don’t think you won’t need outside help. Hire a team of lawyers, accountants and even a management consultant to delegate the distribution of responsibilities throughout the process. Many times the incoming owner wishes to take over more responsibility at a faster pace than the retiring adviser is comfortable with. Management consultants go a long way in easing this tension.

Do be open to some degree of change. Relinquishing your power and watching the business you spent years creating change in front of your eyes can be a difficult pill to swallow. However, standing in the way of the new adviser’s vision will only muddy the process. You must accept that some aspects of your business are going to change under new ownership. The sooner you come to terms with this reality, the better.

No matter how much you plan, transitioning your business will almost inevitably come with a few bumps in the road. However, following this list of dos and don’ts will put your firm in a much better position to smoothly and successfully navigate the transition. Many of your clients have worked with you for decades, and you owe it to them as their financial adviser to ensure their financial futures are maintained. The first step in doing so is to make sure your business is taken care of after you’re gone. So take this transition process seriously and start early. Your clients’ well-being depends on it.

 

Stephen Brubaker

Stephen Brubaker CFP® is president and wealth management adviser at Exit & Retirement Strategies, Inc. He holds his bachelor of science from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

 


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Why Don’t People Work with You? Here Are 3 Reasons to Consider

Your firm offers a solution that people need.

So why don’t you have a line of people out your door, begging to work with you?

For one, people don’t know what you know—if they did, you could look out your window right now and see a crowd of people clamoring for your attention.

The job of good marketing is to communicate your value to people who would make excellent clients for your firm—and to do so in a way that resonates with them.

Pro tip: that might require that you talk more about your problem than your solution.

But let’s assume you’re already doing that. Let’s say your marketing does an excellent job of communicating the right message to the appropriate people at a time when they need what you offer.

Yet you still fail to get new clients in the door. What’s going on?

The Main Reasons Your Perfect Prospect Walks Away

There are countless reasons people make the decisions they do. Some are obvious and overt. Some are more subtle and harder to understand.

The first reason we, as the people making the offer, often jump to is, “people just don’t know about me yet.” Or we say, “people just don’t understand the value of what I’m offering yet.”

Those are easy. Sometimes it’s true. But many times, they’re more like excuses for yourself than reasons people don’t hire you.

If people just don’t know about you, go place advertisements in your local paper or pay to rank for important key terms like “financial planner in [your town],” or “fee-only CFP® for doctors.”

When people still don’t hire you, you can no longer say it’s because they aren’t aware you’re there for them.

When it comes to the financial planning industry, we need to dig deeper to find the main reasons people don’t work with your firm (even when it would be to their own benefit to hire you as their planner).

Here are some of the real reasons perfect prospects choose to walk away from your ideal solution for their needs.

They’re afraid of change. Going from the state of being that is called, “I don’t have a financial planner or a financial plan,” to “I have a financial planner and plan” requires a change. Some people get overwhelmed by that change.

It’s human nature to be afraid of change before you have to go through it. There’s a big unknown on the other side—even when that change is probably going to be good for you.

So we get stuck or refuse to take action, because we don’t want to deal with the discomfort of altering our current state of being.

When you market your firm, consider how you can make that change less scary. Usually, that means eliminating uncertainty and making it very, very clear what’s involved with the process.

They have a problem different from the one you’re trying to address. When you market your business, you need to understand what problems and challenges people have. Then you can offer a solution or provide relief.

The thing is, understanding the root of someone’s problem is really hard. It’s more art than science, and requires a little bit of research, a lot of empathy and a dash of guesswork.

As we discussed a few months ago, you can (and should!) ask your audience what they want from you. But you have to do that knowing people:

  • Might not know what they want.
  • Don’t want to tell you what they want.
  • Can’t articulate what they want.

In identifying someone’s problem—even when they explicitly tell you what the problem is—there is always room for error. You might misidentify the problem. You might misunderstand it and represent it the wrong way in your marketing.

As a result, your perfect prospect is going to walk away thinking, “this firm doesn’t understand my actual challenge.”

Always work to hone your message and your market research. Obsess over understanding your market and take consistent action to get deeper and more accurate insights on how they think.

They don’t trust you. When it comes to the financial industry, this is the reason of all reasons that a prospect won’t work with you. They just don’t trust you.

They don’t trust that you have their best interests at heart, they don’t trust that you’ll deliver on your promises, they don’t trust you can do what you say you can do… the list goes on.

It’s a very simple problem that can feel impossible to solve. It’s going to take time and a lot of effort—but you can win people’s trust before they work with you.

Here are a few ways to do it:

  • Always be authentic. Strive for transparency and full disclosure.
  • Use content to show people who you are (don’t just tell them). Share personal stories and experiences. Deliver that content as if you were sharing it with just one person (so be personable; don’t act like you’re delivering an address full of facts to a faceless crowd).
  • Make it easy for people to learn more about you and understand how you work before they have to commit.
  • Don’t carefully guard your processes, knowledge or ideas. Share them freely and distribute them widely. People who are open and generous with their knowledge attract far more paying clients than those who are mysterious, secretive and stingy.

If you’re struggling to get clients in the door, don’t just assume it’s a failure on the part of your target market—like a failure of being aware you exist or a failure to understand how fantastic your firm is.

Consider taking responsibility instead. Consider if one of these reasons might be the cause. Doing so will lead you to far more productive action than just shouting louder for attention, or arguing more aggressively to make your case that you’re better than the other guys.

KaliHawlk
 Kali Hawlk is the founder of Creative Advisor Marketing, an inbound marketing firm that helps financial advisers grow their businesses by creating compelling content to attract prospects and convert leads. She started CAM to give financial pros the right tools to build trust and connections with their audiences, and loves helping advisers find authentic ways to communicate in a way that resonates with the right people.


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Lessons from Benjamin Graham

When I was growing up in 1997 in a South Carolina town (population 2,070ish, plus two stop lights), every year around this time my class would be asked to write essays on people we admire—people who have influenced us and helped shape our world.

The answers were generally our mothers or fathers, with an occasional Michael Jordon, Mia Hamm, Britney Spears or, for those who sat in the back of the class, Kurt Cobain, thrown in the mix (it was the 90s, after all).

It might be force of habit, but once the weather starts cooling off, I begin to think about people who have had an impact on my world. This year, beyond friends and family, I began to think about someone who has had a major impact on my—and probably everybody else’s—life as a financial professional.

Benjamin Graham. The one who is called the “Father of Value Investing” or, by me (being the financial geek that I was and continue to be) “the Michael Jordan of Investment.”

Graham, who was born in 1884 and died in 1976, documented his ideas and methods on investing in his books Security Analysis (published in 1934) and The Intelligent Investor (published in 1949), which has sometimes been called the “Bible of Value Investing” and is still considered to be one of the seminal texts on investing for the modern era.

Warren Buffett himself said that The Intelligent Investor changed his life. “If I hadn’t read that book in 1949, I’d have had a different future,” Buffett said in a Business Insider article. High praise, indeed.

His philosophy is so second-nature these days, it’s hard to believe it was once revolutionary. His concept was value investing, the principle that any investment should ultimately be worth more than what the investor paid for it.

The lessons I’ve learned from Graham are lessons I both practice and preach.

Look for investments thought to be undervalued. Simply put, buy $100 worth of assets for $50.

Understand the “margin of safety,”—the difference between the stock’s current market price and its intrinsic value.

Understand the health of the business you’re investing in—its earnings, dividends and assets.

Understand market volatility and profit from it. It’s not a question of whether the stock will fluctuate. It will. The trick is how you respond. Invest in the business, not just its current value. When you value invest, you will stop worrying about the market.

Understand what kind of investor you are: enterprising or defensive. Will you commit to the research, monitoring and attention to your portfolio or is your chief emphasis on the avoidance of serious mistakes or losses?

Over the years, market developments have borne out the wisdom of Graham’s basic principles. His core tenets of value investing remain relevant today. Here are some of my favorites. The pages noted refer to The Intelligent Investor, Fourth Edition.

  • “Experience teaches that the time to buy stocks is when their price is unduly depressed by temporary adversity. In other words, they should be bought on a bargain basis or not at all.” (p. 98)
  • “Have the courage of your knowledge and experience. If you have formed a conclusion from the facts and if you know your judgment is sound, act on it—even though others may hesitate or differ.” (p. 524)
  • “This may be set down as a fundamental law of the stock market – that the enterprising investor concentrate on the larger companies that are going through a period of unpopularity.” (p. 63)
  • “Any approach to moneymaking in the stock market which can be easily described and followed by a lot of people is by its terms too simple and too easy to last.” (p. 195)
  • “Much bad advice is given free.” (p. 270)
  • “To achieve satisfactory investment results is easier than most people realize; to achieve superior results is harder than it looks.” (p. 524)
Harper Tucker
Harper Tucker is chair of the Financial and Legal Innovation Practice and vice-president of Authority Marketing for ForbesBooks and Advantage Media Group.

 


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Six Steps to a Great 2018 Marketing Plan

It’s not too early to prepare to rev up your marketing machine for 2018. To help you get started on your marketing plan and calendar, here are six steps we recommend:

Step 1: Begin with a review of your marketing results for the current year.

  • Check your stats for the number of new client households joining your practice this year, as well as the total amount of new assets brought in.
  • What percentage of your new clients would you consider ideal?
  • How were these new clients acquired?
  • What percentage of new assets came from new versus existing clients?

Step 2: What are your marketing goals for the new year?

  • How many new ideal households do you want to bring in?
  • How much increase do you want to see in new assets under management?
  • What is your total revenue goal? How would you break down that goal by sources, such as planning fees, AUM fees, other?

Step 3: Review and refine, or redefine, how you define your target/ideal client.

  • What quantitative factors do you look for?
  • What qualitative factors do you want to see?
  • What are the typical needs and concerns that your target/ideal clients have?
  • What are the unique qualifications that enable you or your practice to serve these target/ideal clients?

Step 4: Review and refine, or redefine, your marketing messaging. How do you tell your story so that it:

  • Connects with your prospective clients?
  • Speaks to their concerns and challenges?
  • Demonstrates your ability to help them?
  • Differentiates you from everyone else?
  • Compellingly calls them to action?

Step 5: What are the strategies that you plan to put in place that will enable you to get your story to exactly the people who need to hear it—your target/ideal clients? Here are some suggested strategies to consider.

  • Raise brand awareness. What will you do to make your message (who we are, what we do, how we’re different from our competitors) known in your community and particularly to your target/ideal client?
  • Promote referrals from existing clients. What will you do to motivate your clients to introduce you to ideal prospective clients they know who need the help you provide?
  • Develop relationships with centers of influence. What will you do to establish and develop relationships with COIs that will lead to their connecting you with ideal prospective clients?
  • What other strategies will you use to engage and develop relationships with target/ideal clients?

Step 6: After deciding on your strategies, it’s time to lay out your marketing calendar, so that each month has specific events and activities that relate to your chosen strategies.

Start with your biggest and most important strategies and events, and get them on your calendar first. Then you can fill in the smaller activities as appropriate. Some planners like to include themes for certain months or seasons of the year.

Events and activities could include:

  • Client social events. Strengthen your client relationships and provide opportunities for them to introduce their friends to you in a relaxed, comfortable setting
  • Educational events. Educational events could include small workshops in your office or local library, presentations to established organizations, or teaching adult education classes at a community college or university.
  • Letters, newsletters and blog articles. Written communications provide an opportunity to showcase your knowledge and expertise in areas of interest to clients and prospective clients, and are easy to share for referral purposes.
  • Notes, cards and gifts. Individual reminders that you are thinking of your clients and prospective clients help keep you top of mind and strengthen relationships.
  • Relationships with COIs. The best relationships with centers of influence develop over time with lots of nurturing, including one-on-one meetings discussing common concerns and challenges.
  • Community involvement. Engagement with and for non-profits and community organizations can help build your brand, enable people to experience the benefits of knowing you and get your story to more people.
  • Networking. Active networking can be done many ways and in many places—in your neighborhood, at social gatherings and while enjoying your favorite sports or recreational activities.
  • Other. You are limited only by your imagination in opportunities to engage with others who could become ideal clients or who could introduce you to your target or ideal clients.

If you are energized and ready to get started but need a little more structure, we would be happy to provide a 2018 marketing plan and calendar template that incorporates the concepts described here. Just send us an email and we’ll forward the template right back to you.

susan-kornegay
Susan Kornegay, CFP® is a consultant and coach with Pathfinder Strategic Solutions in Knoxville, Tenn.


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The 5-Step Formula to Create A Client-Generating Video In 5 Minutes Or Less

Video is one of those things you must do in order to move your financial business forward. According to a DMN3 Study, Gen-Xers and Baby Boomers spend up to two hours per week watching online TV and video. Forty-three percent of boomers watch a video on YouTube daily. Nearly half (48.7 percent) are watching videos to get information. If you aren’t providing regular video content or “tv show,” you can’t be found and you can’t help someone who needs it.

But what do you say and how can you always have something new to talk about? That’s a question we had to answer ourselves. My online TV show, The Ambitious Life has just crossed the 80-episode mark. Then there’s the hundreds of promotional videos, our reality show, Ambitious Adventures, and the 60-plus Ambitious Live courses we’ve created. And all we really talk about is video marketing.

Surely, we must run out of things to say! But we don’t.

As we began crafting original TV shows for our financial clients, we started to reverse engineer how we always had something to say. We also wanted to make it so you don’t feel the pressure to be perfect, but were instead being the best version of you while genuinely helping your clients and prospects.

In doing this, we discovered that they all followed a simple formula. You might think this formula is too simple or too easy to follow. Good. Don’t mess with it. Follow the framework I’ve laid out for you below.

The 5-Step Formula to Create Client-Generating Videos In 5 Minutes Or Less

Step 1: Introduce Yourself. This first step is foolproof. If you get this wrong, we are in big trouble. Start by introducing yourself.

“Hi, I’m X from Y.” All you need to do is replace X with your name and Y with your business name. Here’s my example: “Hi, I’m Greg Rollett from Ambitious.com.”

Got it? Good. Let’s move on.

Step 2: What’s This Video All About. In Step 2 you’re addressing the audience by telling them what this video is all about and why they should watch it. The framework looks like this:

“In this video I’m going to talk to you about X because Y.” Replace X with the topic of the video and Y with the reason why they need to hear about X right now.

In my case it might look something like this, “In this video I’m going to teach you a simple 5-step system to quickly create videos because I believe most financial planners want to create videos but don’t know what to say.”

When thinking about what to film the video about, start by going through all your products and services. Think about things happening in pop culture, like what’s happening right now with 401(k)’s and the tax debate. Make a list of as many topics as possible and keep them handy when you are going to be filming some videos.

After you state the topic of the video, then you give a reason why you are talking about that topic. People like to know why something is important and will help them to stay and watch your video. Now that you have the topic and the reason why it’s important, let’s move onto Step 3.

Step 3: The Story Hook. In step 3 you are going to do the bulk of the heavy lifting in your video, but I’ve made it easy for you. You are simply going to share a story, case study or example that talks to the main point of your video.

Stories are what bonds us together. You want to pull your prospects and audience in with a great story that relates to the topic they’re interested in. We are just looking to tell a story that helps us to make our point and do it in 2-3 (not 20) minutes.

In my example, the story might sound like this, “I want to tell you a story about a financial planner out of Surprise, Ariz. He has a great practice but really wanted to get to the next level and help even more people. I told him to think about creating an online TV show. He wasn’t sure if he wanted to be in front of the camera and if he had enough to say that would get past compliance. I shared with him this simple 5-step video formula and started brainstorming some ideas with him right on the phone. In about 5 minutes we had a dozen ideas and he was hooked. Two weeks later he was in the studio, and just last month we launched his new online TV Show, The Joe Gleason Show, which has been seen by thousands of people all over Surprise.”

That’s it. Quick story that makes your point. Once you have a story idea for each of the 5 topic ideas, let’s move onto Step 4.

Step 4: Relate It Back to The Audience. It’s time to give your audience some genuine help and tips. I know you need to be careful here, but there is still plenty to say and plenty of helpful advice you can dispense while still staying compliant.

Give them one thing (not 100 things) to do right now to get the result they desire. This isn’t a pitch for your service. This is genuinely telling them what to do. It is getting them one step closer to solving their problem (or whatever end result your product or service delivers).

I might do this by saying, “If you’re like Joe and want to take your business to the next level, I want you to go out and shoot a video today. Introduce yourself. Tell the viewer what this video is about and why they should watch. Tell a story that relates to your video’s point, then actually help them. Give them one tip to get the result they desire. Finally, tell the viewer how to get started working with you. Use these 5-steps and you’ll be pleasantly surprised by the reactions you get.”

Simple, right? It tells them what to do, but not necessarily how to do it (that’s why they need you).

Ok, write down one tip you are going to share with your video topic ideas, then on to Step 5.

Step 5: The Call to Action. No video is complete without telling the viewer how they can become a client. We do this with a simple transition after we genuinely help them.

It looks like this, “Hey, if you liked this video and want to learn more, do this.” Naturally, replace “do this” with what you want the viewer to do. That can be going to a landing page to download a free report or to call the office for a free consultation. That’s it. Don’t draw it out, just tell them how you can help them take that next step.

Follow this 5-step system and go out to film your next video. I’d love to see it. More importantly I know it will help you reach more people and make a difference in their financial lives.

Greg Rollett.jpg
Greg Rollett is the founder of Ambitious.com (http://ambitious.com), an Emmy® Award Winning media production and marketing agency for financial professionals and business owners. He is the host of the reality TV show “Ambitious Adventures,” seen on Entrepreneur.com, and the host the Ambitious Life. Reach him on Facebook or Instagram to say hello and share your videos.